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From: TSS ()
Subject: CWD and Hoosier science, stupid is, as stupid does
Date: October 29, 2007 at 11:17 am PST

CWD and Hoosier science, stupid is, as stupid does


Wyoming deer killed by Hoosier had CWD

An Indiana hunter will be allowed to keep the head mount of a deer he killed in Wyoming that tested positive for chronic wasting disease.

The unidentified hunter knew about the CWD risk and submitted a portion of the animal to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department for testing before having the meat deboned for transport home. After the animal tested positive for CWD, Wyoming officials contacted the hunter and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

Indiana DNR officials disposed of the meat, but the hunter was allowed to keep the mount, according to Dr. Jennifer Strasser, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health and a state conservation officer.

"As long as the skull cap and cape are cleaned properly, the hunter can safely keep the mount," she said.

The Indiana DNR has tight restrictions on transporting deer, elk and other cervids into the state. For information go to www.in.gov/dnr/deerhealth/cwd.htm.


http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071028/SPORTS09/710280596/1002/SPORTS


stupid is, as stupid does. ...forest gump


>>>but the hunter was allowed to keep the mount, according to Dr. Jennifer Strasser, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health and a state conservation officer. "As long as the skull cap and cape are cleaned properly, the hunter can safely keep the mount," she said.<<<


i understand most states allow this, but does not make it the safest way.
with the risk of the skull cap and cape NOT being cleaned properly, the risk is just to great to introduce the TSE agent to a state that has not documented it yet. why take the risk ? i think it's foolish. in my opinion, the complete carcass should have been incinerated, including the head mount.


The movement of high-risk carcass parts (brain, spinal cord, lymph tissues) is a potential avenue through which CWD could be spread from infected areas. Investigations in New York indicate that the infection could have been spread by a taxidermist who accepted specimens from CWD-positive states, allowed rehabilitated fawns access to the taxidermy workshop and spread potentially infectious curing salt waste as a fence line weed killer on his deer farm.


http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=458&q=168948


TSS



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