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From: TSS ()
Subject: DEER SCENTS BANNED DUE TO CWD TRANSMISSION
Date: April 25, 2007 at 7:18 am PST



Last updated at 4:42 PM on 24/04/07


Deer scents banned
Wildlife Act amended to avoid chronic wasting disease


BY BETH JOHNSTON
The Daily News

Nova Scotian hunters will have to leave their deer pee at home.

In an effort to stop the contagious, lethal Chronic Wasting Disease from hitting Nova Scotian deer and elk, the Department of Natural Resources is banning the use of deer scents which contain deer bodily fluid.

The disease has been diagnosed in commercial game farms in several states and provinces where the products originate. There are no regulations on the imported scents, which hunters can purchase at WalMart and Canadian Tire.

Hunters often soak cotton balls in the urine from a doe in heat to attract bucks.

Chronic wasting disease – a transmissible neurological disease of deer and elk – is a very serious problem in Western Canada and parts of the United States, said Natural Resources wildlife director Barry Sabean.

“We don’t have it and we don’t want it,” he said.

(For full story, see Wednesday's edition of The Daily News)


http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=24902&sc=89


BETTER LATE THAN NEVER......TSS


From: TSS (216-119-163-192.ipset45.wt.net)
Subject: SEWING THE SEEDS OF CWD MAD DEER/ELK THROUGH FEEDING, ESPECIALLY FROM ANIMAL PROTEIN !!!
Date: September 12, 2002 at 9:52 am PST

CWD AND STUPID SAFETY TIP & COMMENTS TEXAS & SEWING THE SEEDS OF CWD THROUGH ANIMAL PROTEIN? Houston Chronicle

TDH

CWD is probably not a zoonotic disease. In other words, there is
no evidence that CWD can be passed from infected animal to humans

AND

* Always thoroughly cook meat

http://www.tdh.state.tx.us/zoonosis/diseases/CWD.pdf

http://www.tdh.state.tx.us/zoonosis/

with that said, there is no evidence that it cannot, but
my opinion, there is more evidence it can, that it cannot.

AND if you plan on cooking the TSE agents out of the meat
as implied above, you had better ash it to 1000 degrees celsius.

New studies on the heat resistance of hamster-adapted scrapie agent: Threshold survival after ashing at 600°C suggests an inorganic template of replication

Paul Brown*, [dagger ] , Edward H. Rau [Dagger ] , Bruce K. Johnson*, Alfred E. Bacote*, Clarence J. Gibbs Jr.*, and D. Carleton Gajdusek§

* Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and [Dagger ] Environmental Protection Branch, Division of Safety, Office of Research Services, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; and § Institut Alfred Fessard, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91198 Gif sur Yvette, France

Contributed by D. Carleton Gajdusek, December 22, 1999

One-gram samples from a pool of crude brain tissue from hamsters infected with the 263K strain of hamster-adapted scrapie agent were placed in covered quartz-glass crucibles and exposed for either 5 or 15 min to dry heat at temperatures ranging from 150°C to 1,000°C. Residual infectivity in the treated samples was assayed by the intracerebral inoculation of dilution series into healthy weanling hamsters, which were observed for 10 months; disease transmissions were verified by Western blot testing for proteinase-resistant protein in brains from clinically positive hamsters. Unheated control tissue contained 9.9 log10LD50/g tissue; after exposure to 150°C, titers equaled or exceeded 6 log10LD50/g, and after exposure to 300°C, titers equaled or exceeded 4 log10LD50/g. Exposure to 600°C completely ashed the brain samples, which, when reconstituted with saline to their original weights, transmitted disease to 5 of 35 inoculated hamsters. No transmissions occurred after exposure to 1,000°C. These results suggest that an inorganic molecular template with a decomposition point near 600°C is capable of nucleating the biological replication of the scrapie agent.

snip...

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/7/3418

But some scientists advocate stricter measures.

Pierluigi Gambetti, director of the National Prion Disease Pathology
Surveillance Center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, said all deer should be tested for chronic wasting disease before any processing is done.

"There is no way around it," he said. "Nobody should touch that meat unless it has been tested."

snip...

also, what is TEXAS stance on feeding deer and CWD risk?

but before that, lets look at a few things;

Oral transmission and early lymphoid tropism of chronic wasting disease PrPres in mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus )
Christina J. Sigurdson1, Elizabeth S. Williams2, Michael W. Miller3, Terry R. Spraker1,4, Katherine I. O'Rourke5 and Edward A. Hoover1

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523- 1671, USA1
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, 1174 Snowy Range Road, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82070, USA 2
Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wildlife Research Center, 317 West Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO 80526-2097, USA3
Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671, USA4
Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, 337 Bustad Hall, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030, USA5

Author for correspondence: Edward Hoover.Fax +1 970 491 0523. e-mail ehoover@lamar.colostate.edu


Abstract
Top
Abstract
Introduction
Methods
Results
Discussion
References

Mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus) were inoculated orally with a brain homogenate prepared from mule deer with naturally occurring chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion-induced transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Fawns were necropsied and examined for PrP res, the abnormal prion protein isoform, at 10, 42, 53, 77, 78 and 80 days post-inoculation (p.i.) using an immunohistochemistry assay modified to enhance sensitivity. PrPres was detected in alimentary-tract-associated lymphoid tissues (one or more of the following: retropharyngeal lymph node, tonsil, Peyer's patch and ileocaecal lymph node) as early as 42 days p.i. and in all fawns examined thereafter (53 to 80 days p.i.). No PrPres staining was detected in lymphoid tissue of three control fawns receiving a control brain inoculum, nor was PrPres detectable in neural tissue of any fawn. PrPres-specific staining was markedly enhanced by sequential tissue treatment with formic acid, proteinase K and hydrated autoclaving prior to immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibody F89/160.1.5. These results indicate that CWD PrP res can be detected in lymphoid tissues draining the alimentary tract within a few weeks after oral exposure to infectious prions and may reflect the initial pathway of CWD infection in deer. The rapid infection of deer fawns following exposure by the most plausible natural route is consistent with the efficient horizontal transmission of CWD in nature and enables accelerated studies of transmission and pathogenesis in the native species.

snip...

These results indicate that mule deer fawns develop detectable PrP res after oral exposure to an inoculum containing CWD prions. In the earliest post-exposure period, CWD PrPres was traced to the lymphoid tissues draining the oral and intestinal mucosa (i.e. the retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsil, ileal Peyer's patches and ileocaecal lymph nodes), which probably received the highest initial exposure to the inoculum. Hadlow et al. (1982) demonstrated scrapie agent in the tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, ileum and spleen in a 10-month-old naturally infected lamb by mouse bioassay. Eight of nine sheep had infectivity in the retropharyngeal lymph node. He concluded that the tissue distribution suggested primary infection via the gastrointestinal tract. The tissue distribution of PrPres in the early stages of infection in the fawns is strikingly similar to that seen in naturally infected sheep with scrapie. These findings support oral exposure as a natural route of CWD infection in deer and support oral inoculation as a reasonable exposure route for experimental studies of CWD.

snip...

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/80/10/2757

now, just what is in that deer feed? _ANIMAL PROTEIN_

Subject: MAD DEER/ELK DISEASE AND POTENTIAL SOURCES
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 18:41:46 -0700
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: BSE-L
To: BSE-L

8420-20.5% Antler Developer
For Deer and Game in the wild
Guaranteed Analysis Ingredients / Products Feeding Directions

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.surefed.com/deer.htm

BODE'S GAME FEED SUPPLEMENT #400
A RATION FOR DEER
NET WEIGHT 50 POUNDS
22.6 KG.

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod7.htm

Ingredients

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain By-Products,
Forage Products, Roughage Products 15%, Molasses Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Pyosphate, Salt,
Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Acetate with D-activated Animal Sterol
(source of Vitamin D3), Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement,
Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Panothenate, Choline
Chloride, Folic Acid, Menadione Soduim Bisulfite Complex, Pyridoxine
Hydorchloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, d-Biotin, Manganous Oxide, Zinc
Oxide, Ferrous Carbonate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Dried
Sacchoromyces Berevisiae Fermentation Solubles, Cellulose gum,
Artificial Flavors added.

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod6.htm
===================================

MORE ANIMAL PROTEIN PRODUCTS FOR DEER

Bode's #1 Game Pellets
A RATION FOR DEER
F3153

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
Crude Protein (Min) 16%
Crude Fat (Min) 2.0%
Crude Fiber (Max) 19%
Calcium (Ca) (Min) 1.25%
Calcium (Ca) (Max) 1.75%
Phosphorus (P) (Min) 1.0%
Salt (Min) .30%
Salt (Max) .70%


Ingredients

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain By-Products,
Forage Products, Roughage Products, 15% Molasses Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt,
Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Acetate with D-activated Animal Sterol
(source of Vitamin D3) Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement,
Roboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline
Chloride, Folic Acid, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, e - Biotin, Manganous Oxide, Zinc
Oxide, Ferrous Carbonate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Dried
Saccharyomyces Cerevisiae Fermentation Solubles, Cellulose gum,
Artificial Flavors added.

FEEDING DIRECTIONS
Feed as Creep Feed with Normal Diet

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod8.htm

INGREDIENTS

Grain Products, Roughage Products (not more than 35%), Processed Grain
By-Products, Plant Protein Products, Forage Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
L-Lysine, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Monocalcium/Dicalcium
Phosphate, Yeast Culture, Magnesium Oxide, Cobalt Carbonate, Basic
Copper Chloride, Manganese Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Sodium Selenite,
Zinc Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Sodium Selenite, Potassium Iodide,
Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A
Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Mineral Oil, Mold Inhibitor, Calcium
Lignin Sulfonate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite
Complex, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic Acid,
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Mineral Oil, Chromium Tripicolinate

DIRECTIONS FOR USE

Deer Builder Pellets is designed to be fed to deer under range
conditions or deer that require higher levels of protein. Feed to deer
during gestation, fawning, lactation, antler growth and pre-rut, all
phases which require a higher level of nutrition. Provide adequate
amounts of good quality roughage and fresh water at all times.

http://www.profilenutrition.com/Products/Specialty/deer_builder_pellets.html

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

April 9, 2001 WARNING LETTER

01-PHI-12
CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Brian J. Raymond, Owner
Sandy Lake Mills
26 Mill Street
P.O. Box 117
Sandy Lake, PA 16145
PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT

Tel: 215-597-4390

Dear Mr. Raymond:

Food and Drug Administration Investigator Gregory E. Beichner conducted
an inspection of your animal feed manufacturing operation, located in
Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, on March 23,
2001, and determined that your firm manufactures animal feeds including
feeds containing prohibited materials. The inspection found significant
deviations from the requirements set forth in
Title 21, code of Federal Regulations, part 589.2000 - Animal Proteins
Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to prevent the
establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE) . Such deviations cause products being manufactured at this
facility to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(f), of the
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic
Act (the Act).

Our investigation found failure to label your
swine feed with the required cautionary statement "Do Not Feed to cattle
or other Ruminants" The FDA suggests that the statement be
distinguished
by different type-size or color or other means of highlighting the
statement so that it is easily noticed by a purchaser.

In addition, we note that you are using approximately 140 pounds of
cracked corn to flush your mixer used in the manufacture of animal
feeds containing prohibited material. This
flushed material is fed to wild game including deer, a ruminant animal.
Feed material which may potentially contain prohibited material should
not be fed to ruminant animals which may become part of the food chain.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deviations from
the regulations. As a manufacturer of materials intended for animal
feed use, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation
and the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with
the law. We have enclosed a copy of FDA's Small Entity Compliance Guide
to assist you with complying with the regulation... blah, blah, blah...

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g1115d.pdf
===================================================
now, what about those 'deer scents' of 100% urine',
and the prion that is found in urine, why not just
pass the prion with the urine to other deer...

Mrs. Doe Pee Doe in Estrus
Model FDE1 Mrs. Doe Pee's Doe in Estrus is made from Estrus urine
collected at the peak of the rut, blended with Fresh Doe Urine for an
extremely effective buck enticer. Use pre-rut before the does come into
heat. Use during full rut when bucks are most active. Use during
post-rut when bucks are still actively looking for does. 1 oz.

http://www.gamecalls.net/huntingproducts/deerlures.html

ELK SCENT/SPRAY BOTTLE
*
Works anytime of the year
*
100 % Cow Elk-in-Heat urine (2oz.)
*
Economical - mix with water in spray mist bottle
*
Use wind to your advantage

Product Code WP-ESB $9.95

http://www.elkinc.com/Scent.asp

prions in urine?

[PDF] A URINE TEST FOR THE IN-VIVO DIAGNOSIS OF PRION DISEASES

http://www.sigov.si/vurs/PDF/diagnoastika-bse-urin.pdf

1st, other states stance on feeding deer and CWD risk?

?Although there is no proof how CWD spreads from one deer to the next, common sense tells many people that mouth-to-mouth contact is possibly the culprit,? Stroess said.

The feed pile or feeder presents a perfect opportunity for deer to have mouth, nose or saliva contact with deer carrying DWD.

?Just as you and I catch a cold from someone who coughs on us or with whom we have close contact, deer likely get some sicknesses the same way,? he said.

As of July 3, both baiting for the purpose of hunting wildlife and feeding of wildlife became illegal in Wisconsin. This means that backyard deer feeders, feed piles, mineral blocks, salt blocks, protein supplement blocks and all other bait is illegal to use for any deer or other wildlife viewing or hunting purposes.

snip...

http://www.wisinfo.com/heraldtimes/news/archive/local_5812834.shtml

Poulter said the ban on feeding is to keeping deer from congregating and transmitting the disease to one another.

The ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks, and other food products with some exceptions. For example, bird and squirrel feeders close to homes and incidental feeding of wildlife within active livestock operations are exempt from the ban.

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=4994835&BRD=606&PAG=461&dept_id=172213&rfi=6

The department is banning feeding of wild deer and other wildlife in areas where wild deer are present. The ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions. For example, bird and squirrel feeders close to homes and incidental feeding of wildlife within active livestock operations are exempt from the ban.

The rule also bans the importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk carcasses into Illinois, except for deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps, hides, upper canine teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts. Skull caps must be cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue.

Officials from the state said should anyone be caught violating the rule, they would be charged with a petty offense and fined $1,000. For more information about the rule, visit the department's Web site at http://dnr.state.il.us/legal/rules-status.htm.

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=5091636&BRD=1719&PAG=461&dept_id=25271&rfi=6

NOW, what has the media in TEXAS been saying about this type feeding?

here is something from the Houston Chronicle today;

PLANTING SEEDS FOR CWD, TEXAS STYLE...TSS

Sept. 11, 2002, 7:31PM

It's time to plant seeds for deer season

By SHANNON TOMPKINS
Copyright 2002 Houston Chronicle

Texas deer hunters always look for an edge -- something to increase their chances of success or improve the health of deer haunting their lease.

That's why they spend piles of money on equipment such as infrared-sensing cameras to monitor trails and feeders, mineral blocks and protein pellets as supplemental feed and spend restless nights figuring where to put a new blind.

And it's why increasing numbers of deer hunters are investing considerable time, money and sweat equity in creating and husbanding food plots.

"You definitely see a lot of interest in putting in food plots, these days," said Clayton Wolf, coordinator of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's white-tailed deer programs. "People are spending a lot of time and effort trying to improve their land or leases to benefit deer."

Proof of that is visible along highways leading from Houston any weekend for the next month or so. Pickups pulling trailers holding tractors, Bush Hog or Agri-Five mowers and disk sets are as nearly as common as those piled with four-wheelers, feeders and box blinds.

The next few weeks -- now through the middle of October -- are the heart of the planting season for deer hunters looking to sow the seeds for cool-weather food plots.

Considering the expense of owning or renting a tractor and implements, buying seed and fertilizer and the physical work involved in putting in food plots, hunters should approach the effort with some planning and knowledge.

Without it, many of those food plots will disappoint their planters, failing to produce the wished-for lush, green carpets and the regular visits by whitetails.

Wolf, who has put in many food plots as a serious East Texas deer hunter and studied the process as part of his profession, has some ideas and input for hunters planning their fall planting.

·Put food plots in the right places:

The idea of food plots is to make the opening attractive to deer. To do that, it has to be a place that offers easy access and security as well as something to eat.

Best places for food plots are adjacent to travel corridors or other thick cover. Corners of fields and other large openings are good choices, as are right-of-ways, fire lanes and old logging roads.

Make certain the area to be planted receives enough sunlight. This is a particular problem in East Texas where many food plots are placed in openings surrounded by heavy forest.

"You need to get a minimum of four to six hours of good sunlight a day on a plot," Wolf said. "The more, the better."

Look for fire lanes, pipelines or other openings that run east-west, Wolf suggested. They'll get a lot more direct sunlight than those running north-south.

·Don't make plots too small:

Many wildlife managers suggest food plot size of at least an acre.

But clearing and planting food plots the size of a football field is impractical for most deer hunters, particularly in East Texas.

Smaller plots will work, but with caveats. Small plots are very susceptible to being "annihilated" by deer before they become established, Wolf said.

"A lot of people think their food plots didn't `make,' when what really happens is the deer hit them so hard early on that they just destroy them," he said.

·Don't plant too early:

Early September typically is hot and dry -- not prime conditions for planting anything.

Also, if hunters mow and disk too early, undesirable plants can take over the plot.

Best bet is to wait until weather turns a bit cooler, usually by late-September, because it slows the growth of warm-weather plants.

"I really like to wait until October to plant my food plots," Wolf said. "You tend to have cooler weather that holds down the weeds and soil moisture usually is better."

·Do soil tests:

East Texas soil typically is hideous acidic and needs help to produce decent stands of forage in food plots.

Soil tests give hunters information about what their soil will produce and what fertilizers or other substances need to be applied for best production for the plants they plan to use.

Soil tests are inexpensive ($10-15) and easily conducted. For hunters in East Texas, the soil laboratory at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches is the most accessible Information and forms for soil testing can be found at the lab's Web site, www.sfasu.edu/ag/soils/.

·Prepare a proper seed bed:

Getting a piece of ground ready to plant involves more than just mowing and disking.

Typically, East Texas soils are so acidic that agriculture consultants suggest applying two tons of lime per acre to get the soil pH near neutral.

That's seldom possible, physically or monetarily, for most hunters. But a good liming, even if at less than 4,000 pounds per acre, is a big plus.

Also, it helps to apply a good general fertilizer -- 13-13-13 is the most common combination.

·What to plant?

Providing seeds for deer food plots has become big business in the past few years. Several "special" seed mixtures are marketed to deer hunters, most of them promising bigger bucks to hunters who use them.

Truth is, the only big bucks produced by the "special" seed mixtures are the ones going into packagers' pockets. The same seeds can be bought in "generic" packaging for far less money.

A mixture of small cereal grains (oats, winter wheat, ryegrass) and one of several varieties of clover is a good choices for cool-weather food plots in East Texas and much of the rest of the state, Wolf said.

Some hunters add turnips, Austrian peas or iron clay peas or other cool-weather plants to their mix.

The cereal grains come on early, providing forage through the early part of deer season. But oats, particularly, shrivel once freezing weather hits.

That's when clover comes on. Clover provides good late-season forage, and really comes into its own in late-winter and early spring.

Clover's spring growth can be very important for deer, particularly bucks, Wolf said. Once bucks drop their antlers and are rebuilding for the coming year, they'll hit the high-protein clover hard, he said.

Good choices for Texas are crimson clover and a new arrowleaf clover developed by Texas A&M. That clover variety, Apache, is more resistant than other types of arrowleaf to wilt and other diseases.

Find out more about Apache at http://overton.tamu.edu/clover/.

Oats and such should be lightly disked when planted.

Clover does best if simply broadcast, then lightly pushed into the soil. Running a four-wheeler over a plot after broadcasting clover works fine, Wolf said.

·Seek professional help:

Technical guidance biologists with TPWD's wildlife division are professionals at helping folks improve their land for wildlife. They can advise hunters or landowners on how best to approach creating food plots for deer and other wildlife on their property.

Contact TPWD's regional wildlife office with requests for assistance; contact information is available on the agency's Web page, www.tpwd.state.tx.us.

·Don't expect miracles from food plots:

Deer prefer native forage over food plots. If native forage is abundant, they'll turn their noses up at oats and such, just as they will ignore corn feeders when acorns and other native mast are available.

Also, if the overall quality of a tract's deer habitat on a tract is poor, no food plot is going to solve that problem.

Deer thrive best in places with rich, natural, biological diversity.

Food plots can be a positive for both deer and deer hunters though they are not a panacea. But, truth is, what's around food plots is much more important than what grows in them.

Shannon Tompkins covers outdoor recreation for the Chronicle. His columns appear Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays.

http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/story.hts/outdoors/1571427

TSS

Subject: MAD DEER/ELK DISEASE AND POTENTIAL SOURCES
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 18:41:46 -0700
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@uni-karlsruhe.de

now, what about those 'deer scents' of 100% urine',
and the prion that is found in urine, why not just
pass the prion with the urine to other deer...

Mrs. Doe Pee Doe in Estrus
Model FDE1 Mrs. Doe Pee's Doe in Estrus is made from Estrus urine
collected at the peak of the rut, blended with Fresh Doe Urine for an
extremely effective buck enticer. Use pre-rut before the does come into
heat. Use during full rut when bucks are most active. Use during
post-rut when bucks are still actively looking for does. 1 oz.

www.gamecalls.net/hunting...lures.html

ELK SCENT/SPRAY BOTTLE

*

Works anytime of the year
*

100 % Cow Elk-in-Heat urine (2oz.)
*

Economical - mix with water in spray mist bottle
*

Use wind to your advantage

Product Code WP-ESB $9.95

www.elkinc.com/Scent.asp

prions in urine?

[PDF] A URINE TEST FOR THE IN-VIVO DIAGNOSIS OF PRION DISEASES


http://www.sigov.si/vurs/PDF/diagnoastika-bse-urin.pdf

http://p079.ezboard.com/fwolftracksproductionsfrm2.showMessage?topicID=54.topic


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html


tss





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