SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: 100 Diabetics warned about mad cow exposure tissue came from cattle in the U.S.
Date: April 21, 2007 at 9:50 am PST

In Reply to: 100 Diabetics warned about mad cow exposure tissue came from cattle in the U.S. posted by TSS on April 20, 2007 at 5:49 pm:

36. On 5 June 1989 I sent a minute to the CMO’s Private Secretary [169] (YB 89/06.05/3.1)

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/05003001.pdf

reporting on progress. This was unusual for me but I assume I did this as I had minuted

him previously and because of the degree of involvement the CMO had in the issues. The

minute explained that most responses to questionnaires had been received and were

currently being reviewed, and a preliminary scan of the data so far available had not

identified any information requiring immediate special action. Further, the MCA were

applying the new guidelines to licence applications and renewals. The use of bovine

insulin in a small group of mainly elderly patients was noted and it was recognised that

alternative products for this group were not considered satisfactory. (I seem to recall that

later some of these patients did become quite ill when transferred to other forms of

insulin.)

37. I received a copy of Dr Metters’ minute to Mr Clarke of 7 June 1989 on further measures

MAFF were proposing to take to extend the offal ban [170-172] (YB 89/06.07/6.1-6.3).

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/07006001.pdf

This advised of the effect this would have of drawing attention to the continued use of

bovine material in medicines and brought to Mr Clarke’s attention my minute of 5 June

1989. The following day Dr Metters sent a minute to the CMO’s private secretary which

he described as a follow up minute for officials only and it was copied widely to

colleagues in the Medicines Division [173-174] (YB 89/06.08/7.1-7.2).

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/08001001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/08007001.pdf

38. On 9 June Dr Metters similarly updated the CMO on developments [175-186] (YB

89/06.07/6.1-6.3 ; 89/06.07/7.1-7.2 ; 89/06.05/3.1 ; 89/06.09/5.1-5.4) .

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/09005001.pdf

The same day in a minute to Mr Wilson and various other colleagues [187] (YB 89/06.09/14.1)

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/09014001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/06/27008001.pdf

I relayed the information about the proposed offal ban and also sought comments on the

recommendations on pharmaceutical research issues that had been provided in draft by

the Tyrrell Committee. (The report was submitted to Ministers on 13 June 1989.) On 7

September Dr Pickles sent me a minute regarding the Tyrrell report and its implications

for medicinal products [196-197] (YB 89/09.07/3.1-3.2).

Subsequently there was a fair

amount of correspondence between the Departments and their ministers about funding

Tyrrell’s research proposals. I was not involved in this issue.

39. Questionnaire responses were analysed and outstanding replies were requested so that

papers were ready for the BSE Working Party chaired by Professor Collee to consider

them at a meeting on 6 September 1989 [188-195] (YB 89/09.06/10.1-10.8). I did not

attend but I would have seen the minutes or the recommendations, which would have

been available for the CSM’s meeting on 28 September 1989 [198-205] (YB

89/09.28/10.1-10.8). (I was not involved in the deliberations over the sourcing of bovine

material for a particular licensed surgical suture because this was the remit of the CDSM

which, at that time, fell outside my area of responsibility.) The recommendations of the

BSE Working Party were:-

"1. That no licensing action is required at present in regard to products produced

from bovine material or using prepared bovine brain in nutrient media and sourced from

outside the United Kingdom, the Channel Isles and the Republic of Ireland provided that

the country of origin is known to be free of BSE, has competent veterinary advisers and is

known to practise good animal husbandry.

2. The Joint CSM/VPC guidelines should apply to all bovine material

sourced from UK, Channel Islands and the Republic of Ireland and any other area known

to have BSE. Companies which at present cannot comply should be encouraged to do so

as soon as possible. The timescale should be agreed with the Licensing Authority for

each individual product as appropriate.

3. No licensing action is required at present with respect to products

containing material from animals other than cattle.

4. The Licensing Authority should continue to review scientific progress in

the field of BSE, so as to be in a position to take licensing action in the future should this

be necessary."

The CSM endorsed these recommendations.

40. I discussed the action to be taken following the CSM meeting with Dr Jefferys, Dr

Adams and Dr Purves around 13 October as documented in a memo from Dr Jefferys to

Mr Love of that date [206] (YB 90/10.13/6.1). We agreed that the further advice of the

BSE Working Group was needed and a meeting was planned for January 1990.

41. I later received a copy of a minute dated 14 November from Mr Robertson, who at that

time was responsible for administrative issues relating to the CDSM (and therefore for

products such as sutures which were considered by the CDSM) to Mr Davey, the private

secretary to the Minister for Health and copied to the private secretaries to the other

relevant ministers and to the CMO, regarding the possibility of media comment following

a scientific conference on BSE to be held at the RSM the following day. The minute

reiterated the advice of the Southwood report that the risk to man from medicinal

products was theoretical and remote, referred to the CSM/VPC guidelines on

manufacturing issued in March 1989 and confirmed that the CSM and MCA were

continuing to monitor the position [207-209]. (YB 89/11.14/13.1-13.3)

1990

42. I did not attend the January 1990 meeting of the CSM BSE Working Group [210-233]

(YB 90/01.10/7.1-7.7 ; 89/09.06/15.1-15.3) 221-233 (L2 Tab 3B) or the February CSM

meeting [234-237] (YB 90/02.21/10.1-10.8); as a result of the MCA reorganisation (see

below) my responsibilities had changed and these matters were no longer in my area. I

cannot remember whether I would have seen the papers circulated for these meetings. By

about February the new shadow businesses had been formed in the MCA, I had become

co-ordinator for Business E (which was to take on responsibility for the Medicines

Commission and the Medicines database but otherwise had no responsibilities for

licensing matters, the CSM or other committees, or BSE) and Mr Bewley, the CSM

Secretary, had become part of the management trio for Business A. In the Department's

Distribution of Business, however, I continued to be shown as MB1 until October 1990

and so continued to receive some Departmental correspondence. Where I received

material that was not for Business E or, later, B I would have passed it on to the

appropriate person for action.

43. On 13 March the European Commission gave a decision regarding BSE, banning the

export of certain bovine tissues and organs for human consumption and certain other

bovine tissues and organs (including foetal calf serum, lymphoid tissue and cell cultures)

for uses other than human consumption. Dr Metters subsequently sent a minute to Mr

Bewley, copied to me, commenting on the possible effect of this decision on UK

pharmaceuticals. He asked whether the CSM BSE Working Party had considered whether

licensed products that still used bovine constituents should be asked to transfer to non-

UK bovine source material [238] (YB 90/03.26/6.1). Mr Bewley (ex-MB1C but now

Business A and Secretary to the CSM) responded to Dr Metters by a minute of 27 April

1990 (copied to various people including me) [244-254] (YB 90/04.27/5.1-5.4) which

provided an update as to the current position on the few licensed medicines using bovine

material sourced from the UK including stocks of vaccines; all new products were

required to meet the guidelines. Dr Metters was also informed of the advice of the BSE

Working Group. In a further minute of 1 May, Dr Metters indicated that he had noted the

recommendations of the Working Group; he commented that even though any risk of

transmissions of BSE through vaccination was remote, it would be desirable to replace

existing vaccine stocks with New Zealand sourced products as soon as possible [255]

(YB 90/5.1/8.1). He requested to be kept abreast of developments and would have

discussed the issue with CMO if he had considered this appropriate.

44. On 26 April 1990 I attended a CSM meeting [239-243] (YB 90/04.26/9.1-9.5) at which a

letter from the British Diabetic Association concerning the safety of bovine insulin was

considered and a response approved confirming there was no insulin sourced from cattle

in the UK or Ireland and that the situation in other countries was being monitored. By this

time, I would have been aware of my impending appointment to Business B (Abridged

Licensing) and that I would be establishing new links with the CSM.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s476.pdf

Bovine insulin
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."


Hello , it might be beneficial for you to read the DFA 17.
it has some valuable information in it, but some is outdated.
there is disturbing news on the DOSE, and just how much infectivity it
takes to infect an individual. i will post next. meanwhile, the url to
DFA 17 is below the short article........

regards, Terry

--------------
207. On 17 March 1988 Dr Watson and Mr Alastair Cruickshank, Under
Secretary of MAFF, attended a meeting with the CMO and senior medical
officials at the DHSS to discuss BSE.[249] The minute of the meeting
records:
6. Biological products were produced of bovine origin and this applied
to a significant proportion of insulin despite genetically
manufactured sources. In addition, cell cultures for many vaccines used
a bovine serum medium. Dr Harris undertook to speak to the Director of
NIBSC about biological products.
13. Mr Cruickshank thought it necessary to assess the risk in humans in
order to justify the cost of any control measures taken by MAFF.
Although it would be possible to monitor diabetics, it could take 20
years or more before we would be able to assess whether any risk existed
from bovine insulin. In the meantime, with some 40 or so new cases in
cattle a month, the disease would become newsworthy and it was important
that both government departments arrange appropriate action before this
happened.
14. In conclusion it was agreed that urgent advice was necessary on
biological products and the disposal of sick animals. The
options would be outlined to Ministers (of both government departments)
and they would be asked to agree the setting up of an expert advisory
group.
----------------
Medicines and medical devises;

----------------
235. On 2 June 1988, Dr Pickles responded to Mrs Alderman requesting a
further database search and asking about bovine insulin, which was not
on the list of products, although licensed. She also asked about the
species used in the manufacture of any licensed rabies vaccines.[281]
236. Mrs Alderman replied on 3 June 1988, listing products containing
bovine insulin and noting there were two rabies vaccines listed but the
species used in manufacture was not shown.[282]
-----------------------
‘There has been one instance of inadvertant [sic] transmission of the
scrapie agent to sheep through louping ill vaccine (Gordon, Bronlee and
Wilson 1939). One of the three batches of vaccine made in 1935 at the
Moredun Institute contained the scrapie agent resulting in 7% of the
recipients of the 18, 000 doses in the batch developing scrapie. This
vaccine was made from formalin-inactivated sheep brain, and brought to
the attention of research workers that formalin, at a concentration of
0.35% for at least 3 months, which inactivated conventional viruses, did
not totally inactivate the scrapie agent.
----------------------------
4. Questions we might want to have answered are:
the highest risk would be from parenterals prepared from brain (eg
rabies vaccine). Any species in which transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies have been described would be suspect (“natural”
infections in sheep, goats, cattle, deer, mink, but can be transmitted
to hamster, mouse, guinea-pig etc). Are sterilisation processes
adequate for the most resistant strain of scrapie agent or for CJD
agent? Should companies be asked to include investigation for inclusion
of scrapie age

http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/7972.html

Subject: Re: Bovine Insulin CJD/BSE $ Ignorant Doctors (Part 2)
Date: December 6, 2000 at 8:05 am PST

In Reply to: Bovine Insulin CJD/BSE $ Ignorant Doctors posted by TSS on December 6, 2000 at 8:03 am:

4. Questions we might want to have answered are:
the highest risk would be from parenterals prepared from brain (eg
rabies vaccine). Any species in which transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies have been described would be suspect (“natural”
infections in sheep, goats, cattle, deer, mink, but can be transmitted
to hamster, mouse, guinea-pig etc). Are sterilisation processes
adequate for the most resistant strain of scrapie agent or for CJD
agent? Should companies be asked to include investigation for inclusion
of scrapie agent (eg mouse innoculation [sic]) in at least some batches?
If BSE behaves like scrapie, then we might expect other nervous tissue,
spleen, lymph nodes and placenta to be contaminated. Infection has been
described in other tissues too, eg gut wall, and we can not [sic] be
sure blood is free. Do we know what bovine materials are used in which
products, both as the active ingredient and in production? Bovine active
ingredients in human products include insulin, vasopressin, bone, immune
globulins, fibrin, dermal collagen, albumin. Bovine serum albumin and
fetal calf serum must be used in preparation of very many products. For
each of these products would any “BSE agent” be destroyed or eliminated
in processing? If not, and the product is administered parenterally or
topically into an open wound, might there be a risk? [For oral products,
there would only be a trivially increased load on top of that taken in
food in omnivores/carnivores including man. But for some herbivores,
this might allow the agent to be introduced into yet another species].
--------------------------
271. The second part of the paper, entitled ‘Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy – Action by Medicines Division’ states:
1.Product Licence Situation
The computer list shows 53 product licences extant for preparations of
bovine origin and of these 42 are for insulin. It is not clear how
complete this list is, particularly on the review side where there may
be grounds for concern, especially with regard to products for cellular
therapy.
-----------------------------
3.1 Parenteral use
There are three products in this category:
i. Insulin
ii. Bovine collagen implants
iii. Bovine fibrin implants.
The latter two are used in surgery and are the province of the CDSM.
------------------------------
6.2 Parenteral products
The major problem here appears to be with insulin. The use of bovine
insulin is rapidly declining and maybe restricted to those
patients who have antibodies to the human preparation, or who cannot
tolerate it. In this case bovine insulin is life saving, and
the risk to benefit would currently be in favour of retaining its use.
In addition to this for parenteral products in general:
i. All cattle used for the preparation of these products should come
from certified healthy herds, and not to have been given
food supplements containing material of animal origin.
ii. No brain or lymphoid tissue should be used in parenteral
products.
iii. Manufacturers of parenteral products should show that their
manufacturing procedure is capable of inactivating
scrapie-like agents.
iv. While the agent of BSE is not known it is not possible to advise
specific inactivation processes.
7. Recommendations for action
i. No licensing action should be taken against oral products.
ii. All bovine products should come from cattle from healthy herds,
which have not been given food supplements containing
material of animal origin. No brain or lymphoid tissue should be used in
parenteral products.
iii. Manufacturers of parenteral products should show that their
manufacturing processes are capable of inactivating
scrapie-like agents.
iv. All licences for new products from bovine material should comply
with the above.
v. The Review/CDSM Sections should carry out a search for
preparations containing bovine material.
vi. There should be an article in MAIL requesting manufacturers to
identify bovine preparations used in the manufacturing
process. Bovine albumin and foetal calf serum should come from healthy
herds.
vii. The ADR database should be searched for ADRs to bovine products.
viii. The Committee is asked to consider whether to take any action
against bovine insulin or whether the risk/benefit ratio is
appropriate.’[319]
------------------------------
hope this helps out.

HUMAN/ANIMAL TSE's ARE A 'WORLD' PROBLEM.....

TSS

BSE Inquiry Draft Factual Account 17
http://www.bse.org.uk/dfa/dfa17.htm

Q-3. What are FDAs concerns regarding the importation of beef
insulin for my personal use?

A. There is a possible threat of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
or "mad cow disease" transmission through the use of beef insulin if
derived from tissue contaminated with BSE agent.

http://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/beefinsulin/default.htm#Q-3

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/04/30006001.pdf

http://www.vegsource.com/talk/lyman/messages/7632.html

http://www.vegsource.com/talk/lyman/messages/7633.html

http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/326.html

http://www.vegsource.com/talk/lyman/messages/7588.html

http://www.mad-cow.org/00/may00_news.html

Human vaccine prepared in animal brains

http://www.mad-cow.org/00/nov00_late_news.html#fff

http://www.whale.to/v/singeltary7.html

http://www.mad-cow.org/00/jul00_dont_eat_sheep.html#hhh

COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE
NOT FOR PUBLICATION
SUB COMMITTEE ON BIOLOGICALS.
COMMITTEE ON SAFETY OF MEDICINES

CSM/SEAR/88 10TH MEETING.
BIOLS/88/6TH MEETING

This paper was discussed by the Biological Sub-Committee on 2
November 1988, when the following recommendations were made;

1. No immediate licensing action should be taken against oral
products, in which bovine material has been used.

2. All bovine materials should come from cattle from appropriately
certified healthy herds, which have not been given food
supplements containing material of animal origin. No brain or
lymphoid tissue should be used in parenteral products.'

3. Manufacturers of parenteral products should show that their
manufacturing processes are capable of eliminating scrapie-like
agents.

4. All licences for new products from bovine materials should comply
with the above.

5. There should be an article in MAIL requesting manufacturers to
identify products in which bovine materials have been used.
Bovine albumin and foetal calf serum should come from
appropriately certified healthy herds.

6. The above should be drawn to the attention of the review/CDSM
sections along with the need to search for preparations
containing bovine material.

7. The above should be drawn to the attention of the ADR Section and
SEAR along with the need to search the ADR database for reactions
to bovine products.

REMARK.

1. The Licensing Authority's attention was drawn to the need to give
ongoing consideration to whether action was required on bovine
insulin and heparin products.

88/11.02/5.1

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1988/11/02005001.pdf

'political risk of worrying large number of
diabetic patients'

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1988/05/24003001.pdf


207. On 17 March 1988 Dr Watson and Mr Alastair Cruickshank, Under
Secretary of MAFF, attended a meeting with the CMO and senior medical
officials at the DHSS to discuss BSE.[249] The minute of the meeting
records:
6. Biological products were produced of bovine origin and this applied
to a significant proportion of insulin despite genetically
manufactured sources. In addition, cell cultures for many vaccines used
a bovine serum medium. Dr Harris undertook to speak to the Director of
NIBSC about biological products.
13. Mr Cruickshank thought it necessary to assess the risk in humans in
order to justify the cost of any control measures taken by MAFF.
Although it would be possible to monitor diabetics, it could take 20
years or more before we would be able to assess whether any risk existed
from bovine insulin. In the meantime, with some 40 or so new cases in
cattle a month, the disease would become newsworthy and it was important
that both government departments arrange appropriate action before
this happened.
14. In conclusion it was agreed that urgent advice was necessary on
biological products and the disposal of sick animals. The
options would be outlined to Ministers (of both government departments)
and they would be asked to agree the setting up of an expert advisory
group.
----------------
Medicines and medical devises;

----------------
235. On 2 June 1988, Dr Pickles responded to Mrs Alderman requesting a
further database search and asking about bovine insulin, which was not
on the list of products, although licensed. She also asked about the
species used in the manufacture of any licensed rabies vaccines.[281]
236. Mrs Alderman replied on 3 June 1988, listing products containing
bovine insulin and noting there were two rabies vaccines listed but the
species used in manufacture was not shown.[282]
-----------------------
‘There has been one instance of inadvertant [sic] transmission of the
scrapie agent to sheep through louping ill vaccine (Gordon, Bronlee and
Wilson 1939). One of the three batches of vaccine made in 1935 at the
Moredun Institute contained the scrapie agent resulting in 7% of the
recipients of the 18, 000 doses in the batch developing scrapie. This
vaccine was made from formalin-inactivated sheep brain, and brought to
the attention of research workers that formalin, at a concentration of
0.35% for at least 3 months, which inactivated conventional viruses, did
not totally inactivate the scrapie agent.
----------------------------
4. Questions we might want to have answered are:
the highest risk would be from parenterals prepared from brain (eg
rabies vaccine). Any species in which transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies have been described would be suspect (“natural”
infections in sheep, goats, cattle, deer, mink, but can be transmitted
to hamster, mouse, guinea-pig etc). Are sterilisation processes
adequate for the most resistant strain of scrapie agent or for CJD
agent? Should companies be asked to include investigation for inclusion
of scrapie agent (eg mouse innoculation [sic]) in at least some batches?
If BSE behaves like scrapie, then we might expect other nervous tissue,
spleen, lymph nodes and placenta to be contaminated. Infection has been
described in other tissues too, eg gut wall, and we can not [sic] be
sure blood is free. Do we know what bovine materials are used in which
products, both as the active ingredient and in production? Bovine active
ingredients in human products include insulin, vasopressin, bone, immune
globulins, fibrin, dermal collagen, albumin. Bovine serum albumin and
fetal calf serum must be used in preparation of very many products. For
each of these products would any “BSE agent” be destroyed or eliminated
in processing? If not, and the product is administered parenterally or
topically into an open wound, might there be a risk? [For oral
products, there would only be a trivially increased load on top of that
taken in food in omnivores/carnivores including man. But for some
herbivores, this might allow the agent to be introduced into yet another
species].
--------------------------
271. The second part of the paper, entitled ‘Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy – Action by Medicines Division’ states:
1.Product Licence Situation
The computer list shows 53 product licences extant for preparations of
bovine origin and of these 42 are for insulin. It is not clear how
complete this list is, particularly on the review side where there may
be grounds for concern, especially with regard to products for cellular
therapy.
-----------------------------
3.1 Parenteral use
There are three products in this category:
i. Insulin
ii. Bovine collagen implants
iii. Bovine fibrin implants.
The latter two are used in surgery and are the province of the CDSM.
------------------------------
6.2 Parenteral products
The major problem here appears to be with insulin. The use of bovine
insulin is rapidly declining and maybe restricted to those
patients who have antibodies to the human preparation, or who cannot
tolerate it. In this case bovine insulin is life saving, and
the risk to benefit would currently be in favour of retaining its use.
In addition to this for parenteral products in general:
i. All cattle used for the preparation of these products should come
from certified healthy herds, and not to have been given
food supplements containing material of animal origin.
ii. No brain or lymphoid tissue should be used in parenteral
products.
iii. Manufacturers of parenteral products should show that their
manufacturing procedure is capable of inactivating
scrapie-like agents.
iv. While the agent of BSE is not known it is not possible to advise
specific inactivation processes.
7. Recommendations for action
i. No licensing action should be taken against oral products.
ii. All bovine products should come from cattle from healthy herds,
which have not been given food supplements containing
material of animal origin. No brain or lymphoid tissue should be used in
parenteral products.
iii. Manufacturers of parenteral products should show that their
manufacturing processes are capable of inactivating
scrapie-like agents.
iv. All licences for new products from bovine material should comply
with the above.
v. The Review/CDSM Sections should carry out a search for
preparations containing bovine material.
vi. There should be an article in MAIL requesting manufacturers to
identify bovine preparations used in the manufacturing
process. Bovine albumin and foetal calf serum should come from healthy
herds.
vii. The ADR database should be searched for ADRs to bovine products.
viii. The Committee is asked to consider whether to take any action
against bovine insulin or whether the risk/benefit ratio is
appropriate.’[319]
------------------------------
hope this helps out........TSS

>Rick Wolf wrote:
>
> From: "Rick Wolf"
>
> My mother who died of CJD in 1998 was an diabetic requiring insulin
> since the 1960s. She used a bovine based insulin for many years. I
> read in the newpaper yesterday that blood banks are screening
> people who may have used bovine base insulin before 1985 because of
> potential risk of CJD/TSE.
>
> Does anyone have any more info on this? For those that lost a loved
> one to CJD, did they use bovine based insulin?
>
> Robin
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Eileen MacArthur wrote:

> From: Eileen MacArthur
>
> Terry...
> Just got your info on beef insulin..what a blow to read it in
> print. Strange we always suspected a connection with it to Mom who died July
> 17/98. She took it for 27 years...now I really am wondering. I too take
> insulin but not that one.
> Eileen

Reading your emails about vaccines brought something to mind.

Although my mom was the one that died on Dec. 10, 98 from CJD.......my dad died
on June 20, 83 from complications with diabeties.
I remember dad saying insulin was made from pork. Is this still true? Could
diabetics be at a higher risk for CJD?

Terry, would you know anything about this? Just wondering......

Thanks,
Suzanne
riptss

Terry...
Just got your info on beef insulin..what a blow to read it in
print. Strange we always suspected a connection with it to Mom who died July
17/98. She took it for 27 years...now I really am wondering. I too take
insulin but not that one.
Eileen

Greetings Voice members, after reading over Paul Brown statement to
Robin, I find them most interesting, hope he is correct...
Terry

____________________________________________________________
Another thing....I asked Dr. Brown about the Hep. B. shot and it being
manufactured in the U.K. and Belgium and here was his reply......

Dear Robin:

Thanks for the name and address.

As for vaccines, I'm not an expert, but Hepatitis B can under some
circumstances be transmitted from person to person without needle or
sexual penetration, and so for public health purposes I suppose it is
justified to require vaccination.

As for risk of CJD, you would not need to worry, even if the vaccine
was stabilized with albumin from a cow with BSE! Blood from
BSE-infected cattle is not infectious, and even if it were, the
albumin extracted from it would not be infectious. Both of these
statements are based on experimental evidence.

Hope this helps Paul
----------------------------------------------------------------oooops...........tss

9663 Re: [CJDVoice] Your help again [CJD QUESTIONNAIRE PART 3]
... date, name of the medication, the reason for taking it, and route of administration) prompt for prescription drugs, including insulin and type. _ _ _ Prompt for hormone therapy or nutritional supplements including oral contraceptives and hormone replacement ... Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Nov 18, 2001
9:09 pm
19662 Re: [CJDVoice] Your help again [CJD QUESTIONNAIRE PART 2]
... the date, name of the medication, the reason for taking it, and route of administration) prompt for prescription drugs, including insulin and type. _ _ _ Prompt for hormone therapy or nutritional supplements including oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy ... Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Nov 18, 2001
8:59 pm


http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/msearch?query=insulin&pos=100&cnt=10

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/message/22712

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/message/22711

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/message/22695

22717 CJD QUESTIONNAIRE... updated version II...TSS
... date, name of the medication, the reason for taking it, and route of administration) prompt for prescription drugs, including insulin and type. _ _ _ Prompt for hormone therapy or nutritional supplements including oral contraceptives and hormone replacement ... Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
flounder@...
madson1
Nov 5, 2002
12:51 pm
22716 RE: [CJDVoice] CJD QUESTIONNAIRE...TSS
... date, name of the medication, the reason for taking it, and route of administration) prompt for prescription drugs, including insulin and type. No known routine medications to my knowledge._ _ _ Prompt for hormone therapy or nutritional supplements including ... Helen Severietti
helen@...
Nov 5, 2002
12:51 pm
22715 CJD QUESTIONNAIRE... updated version...TSS
... date, name of the medication, the reason for taking it, and route of administration) prompt for prescription drugs, including insulin and type. _ _ _ Prompt for hormone therapy or nutritional supplements including oral contraceptives and hormone replacement ... Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
flounder@...
madson1
Nov 5, 2002
11:46 am


http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/msearch?query=insulin&pos=80&cnt=10

> Tracie Kedzierski wrote:
>
> > Terry,
> >
> > The only problem is that having it on our messageboard conflicts with
the
> > information I have on our home page about the surveillance project
and
the
> > report form I send out to the families.-----it is confusing. In
fact..I'm
> > sorry but we (The Foundation) have to pull it off.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/message/22778

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cjdvoice/message/36030

years ago, ARMOUR use to sell a BOVINE based thyroid drug.
i don't believe they sell it anymore. i think it was called thylar or something.
wonder how many women used that one ???
its documented in the voice archive years back somewhere. ...terry

Q. The Claim: Synthroid is the Best Thyroid Hormone Replacement Drug

If you are hypothyroid, your doctor will probably prescribe Synthroid. This
levothyoxine (synthetic thyroxine) drug, made by Abbott Labs, is the
top-selling thyroid drug in the U.S., commanding some two-thirds of the market
for
thyroid replacement. Synthroid is, however, often more costly than its
competitors.
Some doctors won't hear of prescribing anything but Synthroid however, and
claim unequivocally that "Synthroid is the best."
Is That So?
A. Levothyroxine is the synthetic form of T4, one of the two main hormones
the thyroid produces. The most widely prescribed levothyroxine product is the
brand name Synthroid.
Given that levothyroxine is the conventional medical world's accepted
treatment for hypothyroidism, most patients will find themselves prescribed
levothyroxine, and usually Synthroid.
Synthroid's manufacturer has at times claimed their drug to be better than
its competitors, but research proved Synthroid to be merely bioequivalent -- or
equal, in terms of what function they perform in the body -- to their
competition, rather than better. This claim of superiority, therefore, actually
has no merit.
Many doctors, however, still erroneously believe that Synthroid is "better,"
after being subject to years of this misleading advertising message.
All the major brandname levothyroxine products, Synthroid, Unithroid, Levoxyl
and Levothroid, have different fillers and binders, so people may have
different allergic responses to the different brands.

(http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/iclk?sa=l&ai=Bi9IA5grfRbfFM5j2hASOl\
aD_DLGR5STtuvSkAsCNtwHwpKoBEAMYAyCopfcBKAgwADgAULSK4KT7_____wFgyQaYAdGj0gGq
ARZwcmltZWRpYV90aHlyb2lkK3Rlc3QwsgERdGh5cm9pZC5hYm91dC5jb23IAQHaATRodHRwOi8vdG
h5cm9pZC5hYm91dC5jb20vb2QvaXN0aGF0c28vZi9zeW50aHJvaWQuaHRtyAL1o2-oAwE&num=3&ad
url=http://n339.asp-cc.com/link/click?lid=43000000001754416&client=ca-primedia
-premium_js) So, if you react to one levothyroxine, your doctor might want
to try other brands to see if you react to those brands as well.


Some people who are on levothyroxine also need the addition of the second key
hormone, T3. Among that group, some people do best with the T3 drug Cytomel.
Anecdotally, however, some patients have reported allergic reactions to
Cytomel. The option, compounded or time-released compounded T3, has been used
successfully by other patients, but there have been concerns about these
products, due to inconsistent production. Other doctors and patients prefer a
product known as Thyrolar, a synthetic combination of T4 and T3.
Some patients do best on natural desiccated thyroid drugs, such as Armour
thyroid, or, in some cases, people find the hypoallergenic formula of natural
drug, Nature-throid, works best for them. (Pork allergies, however, may make
these products problematic for some patients. There are some patients and
practitioners who are also concerned about these products due to fears of
prion-related diseases such as Mad Cow Disease, despite manufacturer assurances
that
these products are safe.)
So is Synthroid, or any thyroid drug, better than the others? I think Dr.
Richard Shames, a Boca Raton, Florida holistic practitioner and co-author of
Thyroid Power and Fat, Fuzzy and Frazzled? -- who has treated thyroid
conditions for a quarter century -- has the best advice for patients.
"In 25 years of practice, I have found that it doesn't necessarily matter
which kind of thyroid hormone you start with so much, as which kind you end up
with after trying several different types to see which one works best for you.
Initially, I typically recommend whatever type they have either heard about,
have a "gut-feeling" about, know family members who have a good response to
a particular kind of medicine, or have a philosophical inclination for one
kind or another. Sometimes it it the combination of two or three of the above
medicines that proves to be the magic solution for a particular person. If the
initial item tried does not give 85-95% improvement, I then encourage the
person to either add something to their first choice product or discontinue it
and start something totally new. It is my firm belief that the state of the
art in finding the optimal medicine is still trial and error."
The answer is, the best drug is the drug which safely makes you feel your
best. And there's no predetermined formula to tell which drug will be the best
for you, until you try them, find optimal doses, and see how you do over time.

Mary Shomon, About.com's Thyroid Guide since 1997, is a nationally-known
patient advocate and best-selling author of 10 books on health, including "The
Thyroid Hormone Breakthrough: Overcoming Sexual and Hormonal Problems at Every
Age," "The Thyroid Diet: Manage Your Metabolism for Lasting Weight Loss,"
"Living Well With Hypothyroidism: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You
Need to Know," "Living Well With Graves' Disease and Hyperthyroidism," "Living
Well With Autoimmune Disease," and "Living Well With Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome and Fibromyalgia." Click _here_
(http://thyroid.about.com/mbiopage.htm)
for more information on Mary Shomon.


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. (wt-d4-166.wt.net)
Subject: Re: THYROID MEDICATION, PIGS , PIG FEED, AND MADCOW
Date: August 16, 1998 at 14:14:48 EST

In Reply to: THYROID MEDICATION, PIGS , PIG FEED, AND MADCOW posted by Terry S.
Singeltary Sr. on July 28, 1998
at 14:12:38:

I am having a hard time getting information on ingrediants of these drugs.
Nobody wants to cooperate.
Although I have found the names and ingrediants of some with DESICCATED ANIMAL
(T4/T3).
ARMOUR Thyroid tablets for oral use are natural preparations derived from
porcine (Pork) thyroid
glands. From the late 1890's until relatively recently, physicians worldwide
have treated hypothroid
patients with tablets containing desiccated (dried and powdered) animal thyroid
glands. These tablets
contained both levothyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). In 1958, the first
synthetic
levothyroxine tablets were marketed in the United States. Because thyroid
hormones were on the
market before the Food and Drug Admimistration (FDA) laws were in place,
manufacturers of these
hormones were not required to meet the extensive testing requirements of safety
and effectiveness
required of all new drugs introduced after 1938. In other words, thyroid hormone
replacements, such
as synthetic levothyroxine, were "GRANDFATHERED" into the system, consequently,
there are no
FDA approved procedures or standards for testing these preparations other than
specifying that each
pill contain betwee 90% to 110% of the standard chemical content. Also Thyrolar
contains synthetic
T3. There is also Cytomel. I believe all these contain desiccated animal. I am
still searching. Maybe
the Thyroid Society could find time to list these drugs and their Ingrediants.
None of the Drug
company's will cooperate. You start talking about dessicated animals in these
drugs and asking for
ingrediants from people and they lose their tounge./MADCOWDEADMOMMADSON/TERRY

PLUS, ARMOUR MADE A BOVINE THYROID MEDICATION SOME TIME BACK
CALLED "THYRAR" MADE FROM DESSICATED BOVINE THYROID GLAND...


http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/7811.html

WONDER if any of our loved ones had taken "THYRAR" ??? (way back)

don't ask, don't find, cjd questionnaire. .............TSS





Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: