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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: CONFUSIOUS ASKS, WHY were the Faillaces of mad river valley and there farm quarantined for 5 years ...
Date: July 3, 2006 at 9:23 am PST

In Reply to: CONFUSIOUS ASKS, WHY were the Faillaces of mad river valley and there farm quarantined for 5 years ... posted by TSS on June 28, 2006 at 11:16 am:

##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Greetings,

there are over 20 documented strains of typical scrapie to date. however, we
are talking atypical TSE of foreign origin is what the declaration of
extraordinary emergency was ordered for. if it was just regular scrapie,
then why not all other scrapie infected farms, why were they not treated the
same way, scrapie is and has been out of control in the USA for decades,
it's rampant? if it was atypical TSE in either cattle or sheep, they do not
know SRMs and or horizontal/vertical transmissions. if it were BSE, then why
the fuss of vertical and lateral transmission? so again, were not talking
regular scrapie with those sheep, and were not talking regular BSE with the
mad cows in Alabama and Texas. so confusious is confused still. why not the
same treatment$ ...tss


MAD SHEEP OF MAD RIVER VALLEY

THE TRUE STORY BEHIND THE USDA'S WAR ON A FAMILY FARM

LINDA FAILLACE


The video is available as either a Windows Media Player file or QuickTime
file.

View QuickTime clip

View Windows Media Clip


http://www.chelseagreen.com/images/lambslow.mov


http://www.chelseagreen.com/images/lambslow.wmv


http://www.chelseagreen.com/2006/items/madsheep/FilmClip


I have the book transcript, and wept several times through the course of
reading. IT
will blow you away. I was at a crossroads of being mad because of a 'oh my
poor sheep blah blah blah, to what about my poor mom, mentality', to
Francis and Heather and there plight with there animals, heathers remarkable
dear leon speech, to francis and his true grit, and honorable strong young
man indeed, to 'what about a farmers rights and how far can the gov go
mentality'. i would argue with some parts of the book about atypical TSE and
BSE to sheep and the fact i still believe that not only atypical scrapie and
or BSE in sheep, but some and or all of the 20+ strains of typical scrapie
are transmissible to humans, and the fact in my opinion it was USDA's fault
for ever letting those sheep into the USA in the first place. They knew
Europe was infected with BSE. But USDA got caught up in a bunch of lies and
deceit here with the Faillaces'. The testing is very very questionable to
date.
I guess i might now have my answer as to those infamous 'mouse bio-assays',
but the book is remarkable, i received a copy from the publisher. everyone
in the world of TSE pro/con needs to read this book. .....TSS


----- Original Message -----
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To:
Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 1:44 PM
Subject: Re: DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL
T.S.E. (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES


> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
#####################
>
> Greetings list members,
>
> confusious is confused again. confusious asks;
>
> WHY were the Faillaces of mad river valley and there farm quarantined for
5
> years, all animals slaughtered, and that either the top six inches of
> topsoil removed where manure and or compost had been and or multiple
> hypochlorite treatments of the surface soil to take place from fear of
there
> sheep having BSE, when none of this takes place for BSE cattle in the USA
of
> the typical strain and or the atypical strain as in Texas and Alabama???
>
> SINCE the Texas mad cow and the mad cow in Alabama was atypical BSE, why
> then were there no quarantine for 5 years, no removal of top soil, and all
> animals were not slaughtered???
>
> confusious still confused in sunny, hot, Bacliff, Texas. ...TSS
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
> To:
> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2006 9:33 PM
> Subject: DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL
> T.S.E. (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES
>
>
> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
> #####################
>
> Subject: DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL
> T.S.E. (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES
> Date: June 17, 2006 at 6:56 pm PST
> Greetings list members,
>
> here i go again. i must bring those mad sheep of mad river valley up
again.
> what about those mouse bio-assays? can one of the aphis/usda lurkers on
this
> list, can one of them please comment please?
> a declaration of emergency was announced ;
>
>
> >> Imported
> >> Belgium/Netherlands
> >> Sheep Test Results
> >> Background
> >> Factsheet
> >> Veterinary Services April 2002
> >> APHIS
> >
> >
> >
> > snip...
> >
> >> Additional tests will be conducted to determine
> >> exactly what TSE the animals haveBSE or scrapie.
> >> These tests involve the use of bioassays that consist
> >> of injecting mice with tissue from the infected animals
> >> and waiting for them to develop disease. This testing
> >> may take at least 2 to 3 years to complete.
> >
> >
> >
> > http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/pubs/fsheet_faq_notice/fs_ahvtsheeptr.pdf
>
>
> >
> > DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E.
> > (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES
> >
> >
>
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2000_register&docid=fr20jy00-31
>
>
>
> >
> >
> > DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E
> > (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES [2]
> >
> >
>
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2000_register&docid=fr20jy00-32
>
>
>
> >
> >
> > or if those old urls dont work, go here;
> >
> > DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E
> > (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES
> > - Terry S.
> > Singeltary Sr. 7/20/00 (0)
> >
>
> > [Federal Register: July 20, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 140)] [Notices]
> > [Page 45018] >From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access
> > [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr20jy00-32]
> >
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------------

> >
> > DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
> >
> > Office of the Secretary
> >
> > [Docket No. 00-072-1]
> >
> > Declaration of Extraordinary Emergency Because of an Atypical
> > Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (Prion Disease) of Foreign
Origin
> >
> > A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) (prion disease) of
> > foreign origin has been detected in the United States. It is different
> > from TSE's previously diagnosed in the United States. The TSE was
> > detected in the progeny of imported sheep. The imported sheep and
> > their progeny are under quarantine in Vermont. Transmissible
> > spongiform encephalopathies are degenerative fatal diseases that can
> > affect livestock. TSE's are caused by similar, as yet uncharacterized,
> > agents that usually produce spongiform changes in the brain.
> > Post-mortem analysis has indicated positive results for an atypical
> > TSE of foreign origin in four sheep in Vermont. Because of the
> > potentially serious consequences of allowing the disease to spread to
> > other livestock in the United States, it is necessary to seize and
> > dispose of those flocks of sheep in Vermont that are affected with or
> > exposed to the disease, and their germ plasm. The existence of the
> > atypical TSE of foreign origin represents a threat to U.S. livestock.
> > It constitutes a real danger to the national economy and a potential
> > serious burden on interstate and foreign commerce. The Department has
> > reviewed the measures being taken by Vermont to quarantine and
> > regulate the flocks in question and has consulted with appropriate
> > officials in the State of Vermont. Based on such review and
> > consultation, the Department has determined that Vermont does not have
> > the funds to compensate flock owners for the seizure and disposal of
> > flocks affected with or exposed to the disease, and their germ plasm.
> > Without such funds, it will be unlikely to achieve expeditious
> > disposal of the flocks and germ plasm. Therefore, the Department has
> > determined that an extraordinary emergency exists because of the
> > existence of the atypical TSE in Vermont. This declaration of
> > extraordinary emergency authorizes the Secretary to seize, quarantine,
> > and dispose of, in such manner as he deems necessary, any animals that
> > he finds are affected with or exposed to the disease in question, and
> > their germ plasm, and otherwise to carry out the provisions and
> > purposes of the Act of July 2, 1962 (21 U.S.C. 134-134h). The State of
> > Vermont has been informed of these facts.
> >
> > Dated: This declaration of extraordinary emergency shall become
> > effective July 14, 2000. Dan Glickman, Secretary of Agriculture. [FR
> > Doc. 00-18367 Filed 7-19-00; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410-34-P
> >
> >
>
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2000_register&docid=fr20jy00-32
>
> ================================
> > [Federal Register: July 20, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 140)] [Notices]
> > [Page 45018] >From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access
> > [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr20jy00-31]
> >
> > ========================================================================
> > Notices Federal Register
> > ________________________________________________________________________
> >
> > This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains documents other than
> > rules or proposed rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of
> > hearings and investigations, committee meetings, agency decisions and
> > rulings, delegations of authority, filing of petitions and
> > applications and agency statements of organization and functions are
> > examples of documents appearing in this section.
> >
> > ========================================================================
> >
> > [[Page 45018]]
> >
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
> >
> > Office of the Secretary
> >
> > [Docket No. 00-072-2]
> >
> > Declaration of Emergency Because of an Atypical Transmissible
> > Spongiform Encephalopathy (Prion Disease) of Foreign Origin
> >
> > A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) (prion disease) of
> > foreign origin has been detected in the United States. It is different
> > from TSE's previously diagnosed in the United States. The TSE was
> > detected in the progeny of imported sheep. The imported sheep and
> > their progeny are under quarantine in Vermont. Transmissible
> > spongiform encephalopathies are degenerative fatal diseases that can
> > affect livestock. TSE's are caused by similar, as yet uncharacterized,
> > agents that usually produce spongiform changes in the brain.
> > Post-mortem analysis has indicated positive results for an atypical
> > TSE of foreign origin in four sheep in Vermont. Because of the
> > potentially serious consequences of allowing the disease to spread to
> > other livestock in the United States, it is necessary to seize and
> > dispose of those flocks of sheep in Vermont that are affected with or
> > exposed to the disease, and their germ plasm. The existence of the
> > atypical TSE of foreign origin represents a threat to U.S. livestock.
> > It constitutes a real danger to the national economy and a potential
> > serious burden on interstate and foreign commerce. APHIS has
> > insufficient funds to carry out the seizure and disposal of animals
> > and germ plasm necessary to eliminate this disease risk. These funds
> > would be used to compensate the owners of the animals and germ plasm
> > for their seizure and disposal in accordance with 21 U.S.C. 134a.
> > Therefore, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of September
> > 25, 1981, as amended (7 U.S.C. 147b), I declare that there is an
> > emergency that threatens the livestock industry of this country and
> > hereby authorize the transfer and use of such funds as may be
> > necessary from appropriations or other funds available to agencies or
> > corporations of the United States Department of Agriculture to seize
> > and dispose of animals that are affected with or exposed to this TSE,
> > and their germplasm, in accordance with 21 U.S.C. 134a.
> >
> > Dated: This declaration of emergency shall become effective July 14,
> > 2000. Dan Glickman, Secretary of Agriculture. [FR Doc. 00-18368 Filed
> > 7-19-00; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410-34-P
>
>
> >
> > I was told that ;
> >
> >
> > -------- Original Message --------
> > Subject: Re: hello Dr. Sutton...question please...scrapie...TSS
> > Date: Thu, 20 May 2004 14:36:09 -0400
> > From: Jim.D.Rogers@aphis.usda.gov
> > To: flounder@wt.net
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> FULL TEXT AND THREAD BETWEEN TSS, MAFF, USDA AND DR. DETWILER HERE ;
>
>
>
https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/168556f5aa7a82ba85256ed00044eb1f/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08d?OpenDocument
>
>
>
>
> Greetings again BSE-L members,
>
>
> NOW, i cannot for the life of me figure out why we have not heard anything
> about those mouse bio-assays of those mad sheep of mad river valley, and
> atypical TSE ? i mean hell, there was a DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY
> EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN
IN
> THE UNITED STATES and we never hear of final results, is this not another
> case of the TEXAS BSE PROTOCOLS of just never confirming anything unless
the
> GAO gets involved? maybe USDA could comment on this now? or is this too
like
> those WMD, just something that never existed? i know Dr. Detwiler is out
of
> the loop on this now, but there are others here that could answer this
> question if they wanted too and or could???
>
>
> QUOTE ;
>
> 1998
>
> Dr. Detwiler replied. "There is new research which shows that sheep can
> contract BSE" ......"information I can't divulge".....end
>
>
> WHY, after some 7 years, do we still not have any answers ???
>
> WHERE are those mouse bio-assays ???
>
> PLEASE look on every shelf, maybe same one that those TEXAS MAD COW tissue
> samples were left on for 7+ months before finally confirming after a
> Congressional order and or end around, they could be there. ...
>
>
> still disgusted in sunny Bacliff, Texas
>
> Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
>
>
> FSA 06/06/03 AGENDA 3.1, 15 JUNE 2006
>
> ATYPICAL SCRAPIE IN SMALL RUMINANTS: CONSIDERATION OF THE
>
> CURRENT PRECAUTIONARY RISK MANAGEMENT MEASURES
>
> Executive Summary
>
> 1. This paper provides information on atypical scrapie (a transmissible
> spongiform
>
> encephalopathy (TSE)) in sheep and goats and the precautionary measures
>
> currently in place to protect consumers from the possible risks from TSEs
in
>
> these species. There are a great many unknowns about atypical scrapie,
>
> including the potential implications, if any, for human health.
>
> 2. It also reports on the views of stakeholders and consumer focus groups
> who
>
> were asked whether, in the light of this uncertainty, additional
> precautionary
>
> measures were needed and for their views on the Agency’s advice on this
>
> subject.
>
> 3. The Board is asked to:
>
> • note that the Agency’s advice has been reworded to take account of the
> views
>
> of stakeholders and the consumer focus groups and will be tested further
>
> • note that the background information on sheep TSEs on the Agency’s
website
>
> will be reviewed
>
> • note that the agricultural departments are planning to review the Ram
>
> Genotyping Scheme
>
> • note that surveillance for atypical scrapie will be maintained in order
to
> detect
>
> any changes in prevalence.
>
> • agree that the Agency’s advice and recommendations on precautionary
>
> measures should be kept under review and be brought back to the Board if
>
> there are significant changes in the understanding of the risk.
>
> • agree that developments on atypical scrapie be kept under review to
enable
>
> contingency policy to be refined as new information emerges.
>
> • agree that the Agency should open discussions with the European
>
> Commission on the issue of the identification of meat from older sheep or
>
> goats and natural sausage casings made from sheep intestines to enable
>
> consumer choice.
>
> 2
>
> TSE DIVISION
>
> Contacts:
>
> Alison Gleadle Tel: 020 7276 8303
>
> Email: alison.gleadle@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
>
> Irene Hill Tel: 020 7276 8324
>
> Email: irene.hill@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
>
> 3
>
> FSA 06/06/03 AGENDA ITEM 3.1, 15 JUNE 2006
>
> ATYPICAL SCRAPIE IN SHEEP AND GOATS: CONSIDERATION OF THE
>
> CURRENT PRECAUTIONARY RISK MANAGEMENT MEASURES
>
> Issue
>
> 1. To consider whether the Agency should recommend, on the basis of
current
>
> evidence, that additional precautionary measures are needed to reduce the
>
> possible risk to consumers from atypical scrapie.......
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> Conclusions
>
> 27. Atypical scrapie is definitely present in the UK flock, and in the
> flocks of other
>
> Member States (MS), and animals with atypical scrapie have, and will be,
>
> entering the food supply. However it is not known if this constitutes any
> risk to
>
> human health. Unlike the situation when BSE was first discovered in
cattle,
>
> precautionary measures are already in place. Based on the limited
knowledge
> of
>
> the distribution of infectivity in atypical scrapie, the SEAC Subgroup
> concluded
>
> that the SRM requirements that were put in place on a precautionary basis
> for
>
> BSE in sheep may provide at least a similar level of protection against
the
>
> possible risk from atypical scrapie.
>
> 28. The consideration of the proportionality of any additional
precautionary
> measures
>
> is very difficult when the human health risk is unknown, and, as reported
by
>
> SEAC, there is insufficient data to carry out a risk assessment.
>
> 29. Any additional precautionary measures that could be put in place have
a
> high
>
> economic cost, are currently highly impractical (see Annex 1 for details)
> and
>
> would impose a cost on industry that would, according to industry
> stakeholders,
>
> be likely to bring into question the economic viability of sheep farming.
> ...
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> full text ;
>
>
> http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/fsa060603.pdf
>
>
>
>
> FSA 06/06/04 AGENDA ITEM 3.2, 15 JUNE 2006
>
> BSE AND SHEEP CONTINGENCY POLICY
>
> Executive Summary
>
> 1. This paper asks the Board to agree, for purposes of contingency
planning,
> a
>
> possible approach to a graduated strengthening of measures to protect
>
> consumers in response to one or more findings of BSE in the current UK
sheep
>
> flock.
>
> 2. The paper also notes the high level of uncertainty around estimates of
> the
>
> possible risk from BSE in sheep and that, if BSE were ever found in a UK
> sheep,
>
> the estimate of the risk to consumers would depend on the accumulated
> results
>
> of surveillance for BSE in sheep up to that time. It therefore recommends
> that the
>
> policy be kept under review and that any policy agreed now on a
contingency
>
> basis should urgently be reconfirmed taking into account the circumstances
> at the
>
> time of any finding of BSE in a UK sheep.
>
> 3. The Board is invited to:
>
> • note that, in the event of confirmation of BSE in a sheep, targeted
> testing of
>
> animals in the affected flock or flocks would be carried out to assist in
>
> determining the potential spread of the disease and whether it may have
>
> entered the food supply (paragraph 9).
>
> • agree that an expert group be set up to advise on what additional
> surveillance
>
> should be put in place, if BSE were to be found in a UK sheep, to improve
>
> estimates of prevalence of BSE in UK sheep (paragraph 13).
>
> • agree that, on current knowledge, it would advise the following
graduated
>
> response to one or more findings of BSE in the current UK sheep flock:
>
> • one finding of BSE in sheep - remove additional SRM;
>
> • two findings of BSE in unrelated flocks - exclude sheep aged over 12
>
> months from the food supply and remove the additional SRM from the
>
> remaining sheep;
>
> • three findings of BSE in unrelated flocks - allow into the food supply
> only
>
> sheep that were either genetically resistant to BSE or semi-resistant and
>
> aged under 12 months and remove the additional SRM from those sheep
>
> (paragraph 20).
>
> 2
>
> • agree that its contingency policy for a finding of BSE in sheep should
be
> kept
>
> under review and be urgently reconfirmed should BSE actually be found in a
>
> UK sheep (paragraph 22).
>
> • comment on the outline handling plan at Annex F and the strategy for the
>
> external communication that would be needed (paragraph 30).
>
> TSE Division
>
> Contacts:
>
> Alison Gleadle Tel: 020 7276 8303 (GTN 7276 8303)
>
> Email: alison.gleadle@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
>
> David Carruthers Tel: 020 7276 8305 (GTN 7276 8305)
>
> Email: david.carruthers@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
>
> snip...
>
>
> http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/fsa060604.pdf
>
>
>
>
> Subject: REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCRAPIE November 9, 2005 USAHA
> Date: February 12, 2006 at 1:03 pm PST
>
> REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCRAPIE
>
> Chair: Dr. Jim Logan, Cheyenne, WY
>
> Vice Chair: Dr. Joe D. Ross, Sonora, TX
>
> Dr. Deborah L. Brennan, MS; Dr. Beth Carlson, ND; Dr. John R. Clifford,
DC;
> Dr. Thomas F. Conner, OH; Dr. Walter E. Cook, WY; Dr. Wayne E. Cunningham,
> CO; Dr. Jerry W. Diemer, TX; Dr. Anita J. Edmondson, CA; Dr. Dee Ellis,
TX;
> Dr. Lisa A. Ferguson, MD; Dr. Keith R. Forbes, NY; Dr. R. David Glauer,
OH;
> Dr. James R. Grady, CO; Dr. William L. Hartmann, MN; Dr. Carolyn Inch,
CAN;
> Dr. Susan J. Keller, ND; Dr. Allen M. Knowles, TN; Dr. Thomas F. Linfield,
> MT; Dr. Michael R. Marshall, UT; Dr. Cheryl A. Miller, In; Dr. Brian V.
> Noland, CO; Dr. Charles Palmer, CA; Dr. Kristine R. Petrini, MN; Mr. Stan
> Potratz, IA; Mr. Paul E. Rodgers, CO; Dr. Joan D. Rowe, CA; Dr. Pamela L.
> Smith, IA; Dr. Diane L. Sutton, MD; Dr. Lynn Anne Tesar, SD; Dr. Delwin D.
> Wilmot, NE; Dr. Nora E. Wineland, CO; Dr. Cindy B. Wolf, MN.
>
> The Committee met on November 9, 2005, from 8:00am until 11:55am, Hershey
> Lodge and Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. The meeting was called
> to order by Dr. Jim Logan, chair, with vice chairman Dr. Joe D. Ross
> attending. There were 74 people in attendance.
>
> The Scrapie Program Update was provided by Dr. Diane Sutton, National
> Scrapie Program Coordinator, United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA),
> Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS), Veterinary Services
> (VS). The complete text of the Status Report is included in these
> Proceedings.
>
> Dr. Patricia Meinhardt, USDA-APHIS-VS-National Veterinary Services
> Laboratory (NVSL) gave the Update on Genotyping Labs and Discrepancies in
> Results. NVSL conducts investigations into discrepancies on genotype
testing
> results associated with the Scrapie Eradication Program. It is the policy
of
> the Program to conduct a second genotype test at a second laboratory on
> certain individual animals. Occasionally, there are discrepancies in those
> results. The NVSL conducts follow-up on these situations through
additional
> testing on additional samples from the field and archive samples from the
> testing laboratories.
>
> For the period of time from January 1, 2005, until October 15, 2005, there
> were 23 instances of discrepancies in results from 35 flocks. Of those 23
> instances, 14 were caused by laboratory error (paperwork or sample
mix-up),
> 3 results from field error, 5 were not completely resolved, and 1
originated
> from the use of a non-approved laboratory for the first test. As a result
of
> inconsistencies, one laboratory’s certification was revoked by APHIS-VS.
>
> To reduce/eliminate these problems, the Program has placed additional
> quality requirements on the testing laboratories: additional review of
final
> reports, additional coding systems for testing operations, strict
follow-up
> and reports to NVSL on corrective actions, dual data entry systems, and
more
> frequent inspections.
>
> The Agricultural Research Services (ARS) Scrapie Research Update was given
> by Janet Alverson, USDA- ARS. Dr. Alverson reported on the effect of
> multiple births and fetal position within the uterus on PrP-Sc
accumulation
> in fetal cotyledons. Fetal cotyledons of fetuses with
>
> resistant genotypes can accumulate PrP-Sc when positioned next to a fetus
of
> susceptible genotype with cotyledons positive for PrP-Sc accumulation.
>
> Scrapie Surveillance Evaluation Working Group Update was presented by
Tracey
> Lynn, Epidemiologist with the National Surveillance Unit, Center for
> Epidemiology and Animal Health (CEAH). The presentation provided a
> background on evaluation, a quick review of analyses completed to date by
> the scrapie surveillance evaluation working group, and some of the
> preliminary findings. The process of surveillance system evaluation is
> undertaken to assist a disease control program with identifying possible
> improvements to their surveillance system, and includes an assessment of
the
> overall utility of the system, identification of potential gaps in
coverage,
> and an evaluation of the overall performance of the system. The scrapie
> surveillance evaluation working group reviewed the structure and processes
> of the scrapie surveillance program, as well as various quality and
> effectiveness measures.
>
> Overall, 98-99% of surveillance samples come from the Regulatory Scrapie
> Surveillance System (RSSS), so the RSSS system has been the primary focus
of
> the evaluation process. The working group developed a flow chart
indicating
> the flow of sheep through RSSS, which identified potential gaps in
> surveillance coverage, including custom kill plants and sheep being
exported
> to Mexico. Spatial analyses can assist in identifying areas with high
> density sheep populations with lower levels of RSSS sampling.
Identification
> compliance is being evaluated by reviewing reports from slaughter plants
on
> the proportion of animals with appropriate identification. Additional
> analyses remain, including defining the most appropriate economic
analyses,
> and comparing the surveillance system with developing surveillance
> standards. The working group hopes to have a draft written report for
review
> by the end of the year.
>
> Giving the Update on Scrapie Diagnostics and Susceptibility was Katherine
O’
> Roarke, Research Microbiologist, USDA-ARS. "What’s New in Scrapie" --
Biopsy
> sampling of the third eyelid or tonsillar lymphoid tissue is a useful live
> animal test for scrapie. The biopsy sample is examined for accumulation of
> the abnormal prion protein using immunohistochemistry. A joint project
> conducted by the Veterinary Laboratory Agencies and the Moredun Institute
in
> the United Kingdom has developed an alternative technique in which tissue
is
> collected from the narrow band of lymphoid tissue near the rectal-anal
> junction. The morphology of the lymphoid follicles is similar in the
tonsil,
> retropharyngeal lymph nodes, third eyelid, and rectal-anal mucosal tissue.
A
> report on more than 300 sheep in the United Kingdom (UK), prepared by Drs.
> Lorenzo Gonzalez and Jeffrey Martin, will describe the sensitivity,
> specificity, and optimal collection interval for this technique in a
variety
> of breeds of British sheep. ARS has done a preliminary evaluation of the
> technique in US sheep. Samples of third eyelid and rectal-mucosal tissue
> were collected from 56 sheep. Forty-two (42) sheep had negative biopsies
at
> both sites; most of these sheep have been necropsied and no PrP-d was
found
> in retropharyngeal lymph node or tonsil, showing good agreement with the
> antemortem biopsies. Fourteen (14) sheep had positive rectal biopsy
samples;
> of those, only 12 had positive eyelid biopsies. These sheep will be
> monitored for disease development. However, the protocol is identical for
> all samples and it is probable that these sheep represent false negative
> third eyelid results. Abstracts of reports on the UK studies indicate that
> sensitivity of the test was 70% in the UK; similar large scale testing on
US
> sheep is necessary. The biopsy tissue is somewhat difficult to handle in
the
> tissue processing laboratory and adaptation to an ELISA format may improve
> test performance.
>
> Alexia McKnight, Assistant Professor of Radiology, University of
> Pennsylvania, reviewed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics before
> the committee. A synopsis containing references is attached at the end of
> this report. Dr. McKnight asked the question, "could MRI be a
cost-effective
> screening test, estimated at $25-30 each with results immediately
> available." The committee feels that it is not practical as compared to
> other alternatives currently available. However, the committee expressed
> interest in future reference to this technology.
>
> Dr. Diane Sutton lead the Uniform Methods and Rules (UM&R) and Regulatory
> Issues Discussion. Several modifications to the UM&R were discussed. Eight
> issues were identified and communicated to the APHIS scrapie program
> coordinator. The committee acknowledged that APHIS and the industry is
> adequately addressing the year-to-year industry concerns.
>
> Dr. Kris Petrini representing the North Central United States Animal
Health
> Association District presented five recommendations to the Committee.
During
> the discussions regarding these recommendations it was evident that all
five
> issues had been addressed during the year at this Committee meeting.
>
> The Committee approved a recommendation that USDA-APHIS-VS continue to
> provide indemnity funds for animals that have been designated for testing
in
> Flocks Under Investigation as an alternative to third eyelid testing after
> consultation with the designated Scrapie Epidemiologist (DSE) and the
> Regional Area Epidemiologist (RAE).
>
> The 2004 Resolutions along with their responses were reviewed by the
> Committee.
>
> A Resolution concerning premises registration and identification was
> approved by the Committee and forwarded to the Committee on Nominations
and
> Resolutions.
>
> Committee on Scrapie
>
> Status Report-Fiscal Year 2005: Cooperative State-Federal Scrapie
> Eradication Program
>
> Submitted by Diane Sutton, DVM and Gary Ross, DVM
>
> National Center for Animal Health Programs, APHIS, USDA
>
> In Fiscal Year 2005 the Scrapie Eradication Program focused on: (1)
> utilization of a genetic based approach to flock clean-up plans; (2)
> cleaning up infected and source flocks; (3) tracing and testing exposed
> animals and flocks; (4) expansion of regulatory slaughter surveillance
> (RSSS); (5) conducting considtent state reviews, (6) producer education;
(7)
> upgrading of the Scrapie National Generic Database and (8) publishing the
> updated Scrapie Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules (UM&R). The current
> Scrapie Eradication UM&R is posted at
> http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahps/scrapie/umr-scrapie-erad.pdf.
>
> Consistent State Reviews
>
> States must meet the requirements in 9 CFR 79.6 in order to move sheep and
> goats in interstate commerce with minimal restrictions. Twenty seven
states
> have enacted the required identification rules, the remaining states have
> submitted a work plan that describes the steps that will be taken to
comply
> and provided a timeline for completing significant milestones. USDA is
> conducting onsite scrapie program consistent state reviews and has
completed
> reviews in 12 states. States must be in full compliance by the end of
their
> current rule making cycle. States not in full compliance at that time will
> be removed from the consistent state list. Removal from the list would
> create a significant impact on the interstate movement of sheep and goats
> from those States.
>
> Scrapie Flock Certification Program
>
> As of September 30, 2005, there were 1,961 flocks participating in the
> Scrapie Flock Certification Program (SFCP). Of these flocks 188 were
> certified flocks, 1,770 were complete monitored flocks, and 3 were
selective
> monitored flocks (figure 2). There were 209 flocks newly enrolled and 53
> newly certified (13 with status dates in FY 2005 and 40 with status dates
in
> previous years) in FY 2005 (figure 3).
>
> Infected and Source Flocks
>
> As of September 30, 2005, there were 105 scrapie infected and source
flocks.
> There were a total of 165** new infected and source flocks reported for FY
> 2005. The total infected and source flocks that have been released in FY
> 2005 was 128. The ratio of infected and source flocks cleaned up or placed
> on clean up plans vs. new infected and source flocks discovered in FY 2005
> was 1.03 : 1*. In addition 622 scrapie cases were confirmed and reported
by
> the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in FY 2005, of which
> 130 were RSSS cases. Fifteen cases of scrapie in goats have been reported
> since 1990. The last goat case was reported in May 2005. Approximately
5,626
> animals were indemnified comprised of 49% non-registered sheep, 45%
> registered sheep, 1.4% non-registered goats and 4.6% registered goats.
>
> Regulatory Scrapie Slaughter Surveillance (RSSS)
>
> RSSS was designed to utilize the findings of the Center for Epidemiology
and
> Animal Health (CEAH) Scrapie: Ovine Slaughter Surveillance (SOSS) study.
The
> results of SOSS can be found at
> http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cahm/Sheep/sheep.htm . RSSS started
April
> 1,
>
> 2003. It is a targeted slaughter surveillance program which is designed to
> identify infected flocks for clean-up. During FY 2005 collections
increased
> by 32% overall and by 90% for black and mottled faced sheep improving
> overall program effectiveness and efficiency as demonstrated by the 26%
> decrease in percent positive black faced sheep compared to FY 2004.
Samples
> have been collected from 62,864 sheep since April 1, 2003, of which
results
> have been reported for 59,105 of which 209 were confirmed positive. During
F
> Y 2005, 33,137 samples were collected from 81 plants. There have been 130
> NVSL confirmed positive cases (30 collected in FY 2004 and confirmed in FY
> 2005 and 100 collected and confirmed in FY 2005) in FY 2005. Face colors
of
> these positives were 114 black, 14 mottled, 1 white and 1 unknown. The
> percent positive by face color is shown in the chart below.
>
> Scrapie Testing
>
> In FY 2005, 35,845 animals have been tested for scrapie: 30,192 RSSS;
4,742
> regulatory field cases; 772 regulatory third eyelid biopsies; 10 third
> eyelid validations; and 129 necropsy validations (chart 9).
>
> Animal ID
>
> As of October 04, 2005, 103,580 sheep and goat premises have been assigned
> identification numbers in the Scrapie National Generic Database. Official
> eartags have been issued to 73,807 of these premises.
>
> *This number based on an adjusted 12 month interval to accommodate the 60
> day period for setting up flock plans.
>
>
>
> http://www.usaha.org/committees/reports/2005/report-scr-2005.pdf
>
>
>
>
>
> Subject: SCRAPIE USA UPDATE AS of March 31, 2006 2 NEW CASES IN GOAT, 82
> INFECTED SOURCE FLOCKS, 19 INFECTED RSSS
>
> Date: April 30, 2006 at 4:49 pm PST
> SCRAPIE USA UPDATE AS of March 31, 2006
>
>
> 2 NEW CASES IN GOAT, 82 INFECTED SOURCE FLOCKS, WITH 4 NEW INFECTED SOURCE
> FLOCKS IN MARCH, WITH 19 SCRAPIE INFECTED RSSS REPORTED BY NVSL
>
>
>
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahps/scrapie/monthly_report/monthly-report.html
>
>
>
>
> 12/10/76
> AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
> REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTE ON SCRAPIE
> Office Note
> CHAIRMAN: PROFESSOR PETER WILDY
>
> snip...
>
> A The Present Position with respect to Scrapie
> A] The Problem
>
> Scrapie is a natural disease of sheep and goats. It is a slow
> and inexorably progressive degenerative disorder of the nervous system
> and it ia fatal. It is enzootic in the United Kingdom but not in all
> countries.
>
> The field problem has been reviewed by a MAFF working group
> (ARC 35/77). It is difficult to assess the incidence in Britain for
> a variety of reasons but the disease causes serious financial loss;
> it is estimated that it cost Swaledale breeders alone $l.7 M during
> the five years 1971-1975. A further inestimable loss arises from the
> closure of certain export markets, in particular those of the United
> States, to British sheep.
>
> It is clear that scrapie in sheep is important commercially and
> for that reason alone effective measures to control it should be
> devised as quickly as possible.
>
> Recently the question has again been brought up as to whether
> scrapie is transmissible to man. This has followed reports that the
> disease has been transmitted to primates. One particularly lurid
> speculation (Gajdusek 1977) conjectures that the agents of scrapie,
> kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and transmissible encephalopathy of
> mink are varieties of a single "virus". The U.S. Department of
> Agriculture concluded that it could "no longer justify or permit
> scrapie-blood line and scrapie-exposed sheep and goats to be processed
> for human or animal food at slaughter or rendering plants" (ARC 84/77)"
> The problem is emphasised by the finding that some strains of scrapie
> produce lesions identical to the once which characterise the human
> dementias"
>
> Whether true or not. the hypothesis that these agents might be
> transmissible to man raises two considerations. First, the safety
> of laboratory personnel requires prompt attention. Second, action
> such as the "scorched meat" policy of USDA makes the solution of the
> acrapie problem urgent if the sheep industry is not to suffer
> grievously.
>
> snip...
>
>
> 76/10.12/4.6
>
>
> http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1976/10/12004001.pdf
>
>
>
>
> Published online before print October 20, 2005
>
> Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 10.1073/pnas.0502296102
> Medical Sciences
>
> A newly identified type of scrapie agent can naturally infect sheep with
> resistant PrP genotypes
>
> ( sheep prion | transgenic mice )
>
> Annick Le Dur *, Vincent Béringue *, Olivier Andréoletti , Fabienne Reine
*,
> Thanh Lan Laï *, Thierry Baron , Bjørn Bratberg ¶, Jean-Luc Vilotte ||,
> Pierre Sarradin **, Sylvie L. Benestad ¶, and Hubert Laude *
> *Virologie Immunologie Moléculaires and ||Génétique Biochimique et
> Cytogénétique, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 78350
> Jouy-en-Josas, France; Unité Mixte de Recherche, Institut National de la
> Recherche Agronomique-Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse,
Interactions
> Hôte Agent Pathogène, 31066 Toulouse, France; Agence Française de Sécurité
> Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Agents Transmissibles Non Conventionnels,
> 69364 Lyon, France; **Pathologie Infectieuse et Immunologie, Institut
> National de la Recherche Agronomique, 37380 Nouzilly, France; and
> ¶Department of Pathology, National Veterinary Institute, 0033 Oslo, Norway
>
>
> Edited by Stanley B. Prusiner, University of California, San Francisco,
CA,
> and approved September 12, 2005 (received for review March 21, 2005)
>
> Scrapie in small ruminants belongs to transmissible spongiform
> encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, a family of fatal
> neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals and can
transmit
> within and between species by ingestion or inoculation. Conversion of the
> host-encoded prion protein (PrP), normal cellular PrP (PrPc), into a
> misfolded form, abnormal PrP (PrPSc), plays a key role in TSE transmission
> and pathogenesis. The intensified surveillance of scrapie in the European
> Union, together with the improvement of PrPSc detection techniques, has
led
> to the discovery of a growing number of so-called atypical scrapie cases.
> These include clinical Nor98 cases first identified in Norwegian sheep on
> the basis of unusual pathological and PrPSc molecular features and "cases"
> that produced discordant responses in the rapid tests currently applied to
> the large-scale random screening of slaughtered or fallen animals.
> Worryingly, a substantial proportion of such cases involved sheep with PrP
> genotypes known until now to confer natural resistance to conventional
> scrapie. Here we report that both Nor98 and discordant cases, including
> three sheep homozygous for the resistant PrPARR allele (A136R154R171),
> efficiently transmitted the disease to transgenic mice expressing ovine
PrP,
> and that they shared unique biological and biochemical features upon
> propagation in mice. These observations support the view that a truly
> infectious TSE agent, unrecognized until recently, infects sheep and goat
> flocks and may have important implications in terms of scrapie control and
> public health.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Author contributions: H.L. designed research; A.L.D., V.B., O.A., F.R.,
> T.L.L., J.-L.V., and H.L. performed research; T.B., B.B., P.S., and S.L.B.
> contributed new reagents/analytic tools; V.B., O.A., and H.L. analyzed
data;
> and H.L. wrote the paper.
>
> A.L.D. and V.B. contributed equally to this work.
>
> To whom correspondence should be addressed.
>
> Hubert Laude, E-mail: laude@jouy.inra.fr
>
>
>
> www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0502296102
>
>
>
>
> http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0502296102v1
>
>
>
>
>
> Of greatest interest today is the BSE agent because it is the presumptive
> cause of new variant CJD and must be considered a demonstrated risk to
human
> health. The scrapie agent poses a theoretical risk to human health.
>
> Today we ask you to consider the implications of two theoretical
> possibilities: the first, that sheep and goats in BSE countries
> theoretically might be infected with the BSE agent, and Professor Almond,
> who headed a subcommittee of the United Kingdom's Spongiform
Encephalopathy
> Advisory Committee, has agreed to review that topic for us today.
>
> Then scrapie, which theoretically might be a human pathogen, though
there's
> no hard evidence for that, and of course, some number of sheep and goats
in
> many countries, including the United States, are infected with the scrapie
> agent.
>
> Now, let me say now that no U.S. government regulatory authority would
ever
> knowingly permit humans or animals to be exposed to a product containing
the
> scrapie agent, but considering the nature of the scrapie agent and the
> disease, we are not so naive as to think that such exposures have not
> already occurred. ...
>
>
> FULL TEXT ;
>
>
>
>
> http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/99/transcpt/3518t2.rtf
>
>
>
>
http://72.14.209.104/searchq=cache:pKJPlLI2R44J:www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/99/transcpt/3518t2.rtf+scrapie+strains+breed+east+friesian&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=23
>
>
>
>
>
> TSS
>
> #################### https://lists.aegee.org/bse-l.html
> ####################
>
> #################### https://lists.aegee.org/bse-l.html
####################
>

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