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From: TSS ()
Subject: CANADA REVISED BSE MEASURES FOR U.S. IMPORTS
Date: June 29, 2006 at 12:19 pm PST


Latest Information (as of June 29, 2006 - 14:00 EST)
Canada is opening its border to a broader range of animals and animal products from the United States, which were suspended following the confirmation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington State in 2003.
Effective immediately, all classes of U.S. cattle, including those for breeding purposes born after 1999, are eligible for entry based on prescribed certification requirements. As well, beef from cattle over 30 months of age will also be eligible for importation under certain conditions.
Prohibitions on certain U.S. commodities are being maintained to prevent the importation of high-risk products, such as specified risk materials (SRM) or products containing these materials. SRM are those tissues known to have the potential to harbour BSE infectivity. These import controls provide continued protection of human and animal health from BSE and are reflective of the most recent international standards for BSE of the World Organization for Animal Health.
News Release
Regulatory Amendments
Update to Import Restrictions - United States

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/situatione.shtml



REVISED BSE MEASURES FOR U.S. IMPORTS
OTTAWA, June 29, 2006 - Canada is opening its border to a broader range of animals and animal products from the United States, which were suspended following the confirmation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington State in 2003.

Effective immediately, all classes of U.S. cattle, including those for breeding purposes born after 1999, are eligible for entry based on prescribed certification requirements. As well, beef from cattle over 30 months of age will also be eligible for importation under certain conditions.

"Canada's import controls continue to provide the highest levels of public and animal health protection," said Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Chuck Strahl. "At the same time, Canada's new government is moving closer to re-integrating the North American cattle market, in accordance with international standards."

The scope of the prohibitions has been narrowed several times, based on the safeguards implemented in both Canada and the United States, and the most current understanding of BSE available. This approach is science-based and moves Canada and the United States closer to fully normalizing trade within the North American cattle market.

Prohibitions on certain U.S. commodities are being maintained to prevent the importation of high-risk products, such as specified risk materials (SRM) or products containing these materials. SRM are those tissues known to have the potential to harbour BSE infectivity. These import controls provide continued protection of human and animal health from BSE and are reflective of the most recent international standards for BSE of the World Organization for Animal Health.

As a general practice, Canada’s animal health import restrictions are reviewed on an ongoing basis to ensure they reflect the most current scientific information, remain effective and do not impose unwarranted trade barriers. In the context of BSE, import controls are one component of a suite of safeguards that protects human and animal health from BSE. Other measures include feed controls, surveillance testing and the removal of high-risk tissues from all animals slaughtered for human consumption.

- 30 -

For more information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Media relations: (613) 228-6682

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/newcom/2006/20060629e.shtml

Title Certain Ruminants and Their Products Importation Prohibition, No. 2
SOR 2006-168
Date Registered June 27, 2006
Information Documents Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement
Approved Amendment


Title Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Administered and Enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
SOR 2006-147
Date Registered June 23, 2006
Information Documents Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement
Approved Amendment


http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/reg/approe.shtml

Update to Import Restrictions - United States
Effective June 29, 2006, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has expanded access under its import regulations to allow for a range of U.S. animals and their products and by-products that have been prohibited since a case of BSE was detected in Washington State in December 2003.

The current prohibition regulation which prevents the introduction into Canada of U.S. animals or products that would pose a risk of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) was due to expire on June 30, 2006.

The CFIA has determined that it is appropriate to replace this regulation with a new one which further narrows the prohibitions but continues to prohibit those commodities that are still considered to pose a risk at this time.

Examples of prohibited commodities:
Live animals and genetic material

Animals of the sub-family Bovinae, such as cattle, bison, water buffalo and their exotic relatives, born before January 1, 1999* as well as animals of the species Capra hircus (domestic goats) and Ovis aries (domestic sheep).
Meat products for human consumption

Meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae and from animals of the species Capra hircus and Ovis aries, as well as things containing such meat products.
Miscellaneous animal products and by-products

Ingredients derived from ruminants for use in animal food and animal food containing those ingredients.
Ingredients, other than manure, derived from ruminants to be used in fertilizer and fertilizer containing those ingredients.
Specified risk material (SRM) from the animals of the family Bovinae (e.g. brain of cattle and bison).
Examples of exempted commodities:
Live animals and genetic material

Bucks, bulls and rams that are destined for animal semen production centres.
Cattle imported for immediate slaughter.
Animals for temporary stay (maximum of 30 days).
Animals and things derived from them imported for medical use, scientific research or zoological collections.
Sheep and goats under 12 months of age imported for immediate slaughter or feeding for slaughter.*
Meat products for human consumption

Meat products of animals of the sub-family Bovinae younger than 30 months of age from which the distal ileum and tonsils have been removed.
Meat products originating in Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Uruguay, Canada or Brazil that are eligible for importation into Canada and that are processed in the US.
Edible and inedible beef liver.*
Goat and sheep meat products from animals younger than 12 months of age.
Meat products originating in Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Uruguay, or Brazil that are in transit in the US and that are eligible for importation into Canada.
Meat products that are kept on a ship as ships stores.
Meat products intended to be used for personal consumption (less than five kilograms in total).
Milk and milk derivatives.
Meat products to be transported to a community in the United States where the only practical transportation route for the Meat products is either a land or water route through Canada as determined by the CFIA.
Meat products to be transported non-stop in Canada and to be delivered to a cruise ship for use as ships' stores.
Food containing meat products in insignificant quantity.
Miscellaneous animal products and by-products

Products of a rendering plant imported into Canada under an import permit issued after December 25, 2003;
Hides, skins and their derivatives excluding the part of the hides and skins that come from the head of an animal; *
Wool
Pet chews (not containing Bovinae specified risk materials (SRM) or vertebral column);
Protein-free tallow;
Household garbage from the US containing animal protein;
Aircraft garbage and ships’ refuse;
Commercially prepared pet food that does not contain ingredients derived from Bovinae;
Commercially prepared pet food that contains ingredients derived from Bovinae if the ingredients are not derived from Bovinae SRM, or that originates from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, New Zealand or Uruguay*
Things from bones and tissue (not SRM from animals of the sub-family Bovinae) subjected to rigorous processes of extraction and purification.
N.B.: Cervidae, Camelidae, Giraffidae, Tragulidae and Antilocapridae and things derived therefrom are not included in the Prohibitions Regulations.

* Indicates changes from the March 25, 2004 prohibitions.

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/americ/imprestricte.shtml

TSS




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