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From: TSS ()
Subject: Japan confirms 23rd BSE case
Date: March 15, 2006 at 6:54 am PST

Japan confirms 23rd BSE case
Wednesday, March 15, 2006, 8:43 AM

by Cyndi Young

The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare today announced confirmation of Japan's
23rd case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE.)

According to the ministry's statement, the 68-month-old female Holstein cow was raised in Nakagawa, Hokkaido.

Japan discovered its first mad cow case in September 2001. The government later started introducing measures to screen every cow slaughtered for human consumption.

Japan imposed a ban on U.S. beef in December 2003 when a Washington State cow tested positive for BSE. The ban, which was lifted in December 2005, was re-imposed a month later when a shipment of U.S. veal was found to contain vertebral column parts.

Japan has now confirmed a total of 20 more BSE-positive cows than have been confirmed in the U.S.

Related Links:
Japanese Ministry of Health


http://www.brownfieldnetwork.com/gestalt/go.cfm?objectid=FE5BFB83-AFA4-A5C2-EA5E2D395F23C952


TOKYO, March 15 (Xinhuanet) -- A 68-month-old diary cow on a farm in northern Japan's Hokkaido was confirmed to have contracted mad cow disease, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare announced Wednesday.

This is Japan's 23rd case of mad cow disease, or formally known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

According to the ministry's statement, the female Holstein cow, which was raised in Nakagawa, Hokkaido prefecture, was suspected to have caught the disease in a preliminary test on Monday. Its sample was later sent for re-examination and the results were also positive.

Japan discovered its first mad cow case in September 2001. The government later started introducing measures to screen every cow slaughtered for consumption.

Japan imposed a ban on U.S. beef in December 2003 after the mad cow disease was found in a U.S. herd. The ban, which was lifted in December 2005, has been re-imposed a month later when a U.S. beef shipment was found to contain risky body part. Enditem

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-03/15/content_4307236.htm

Japan has confirmed its 23rd case of mad cow disease in a 5-year-old Holstein reared for food, the Health Ministry said Wednesday.

The bull, reared at a farm on Japan's northernmost main island of Hokkaido, was killed on Monday and tested positive for the degenerative disease in a routine test on Wednesday, the ministry said in a statement.

All body parts from the bull have been destroyed, and the case poses no risk to Japan's food supply, according to the ministry.

Authorities were investigating the infection route to determine whether other cattle on the farm should be destroyed, according to Atsuko Suzuki, a spokeswoman at the Agricultural Ministry.

The latest case follows the discovery of the third case of mad cow in the U.S. on Monday.

Japan has halted all imports of U.S. beef over mad cow fears, following the discovery of prohibited backbone material in a shipment of American veal in January.

The bones are deemed to be at risk of mad cow disease and are banned under a deal that reopened the Japanese market to U.S. beef in December.

Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, is a brain-wasting disease in cattle, which in humans can cause a variant form, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

The disease has killed more than 150 people, mostly in Britain, where there was an outbreak in the 1990s, reports the AP.

http://english.pravda.ru/news/world/15-03-2006/77319-Japan-0


TSS




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