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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: JOHANN TRANSCRIPT ON INVESTIGATION INTO SPINAL CORD AND MEAT OFFAL TO JAPAN
Date: February 20, 2006 at 8:11 am PST

In Reply to: JOHANN TRANSCRIPT ON INVESTIGATION INTO SPINAL CORD AND MEAT OFFAL TO JAPAN posted by TSS on February 20, 2006 at 7:15 am:

JOHANNS STATES;

>>>Under the OIE standards, any beef is safe with safeguards in place. You know it isn't tied to that age, and those are some fairly recent changes to OIE standards. But we endeavor to live by the OIE standards because we have the ability to send scientists and engage in discussion relative to those standards. Japan would, anybody would. And the best scientists in the world look at these issues and decide what those standards should be. <<<


IF anyone would just look at the consistently weak standards most every country went by from the OIE on BSE, it was those weak standards that allowed this agent to spread from hear to kingdomcome. Those same Countries that went by those weak guidelines developed BSE. AND today, those standards are much weaker due to the BSE MRR policy of trading all strains of TSE globally. THE BSE MRR policy was not based on sound science, but on trade, commodities and futures. ...

SNIP...


JOHANNS STATES;

>>>The other thing I would say, Asuka, to the Japanese consumer is this. I enjoy beef every day in my diet. It is a very unusual day that I don't enjoy U.S. beef. My family enjoys it. My children. My grandchildren. I will also share with you that there's no special provisions here. I walk into a supermarket like any other consumer in the United States. I go to the counter where they sell U.S. beef. I look at it with my wife Stephanie, and there isn't a time that we don't go to the grocery store and buy beef from that counter. We take it home, we prepare it, and we enjoy it with our family. <<<

>>>There isn't a danger here to the Japanese consumer. <<<


JOHANNS et al have now joined the list of disgraced leaders that have used there loved ones (and ours, we have proof, there dead) as guinea pigs, to further enhance there trade. Johanns can stand tall now with the likes of Gummer force feeding his daughter a hamburger in the UK at a photo op;


http://www.maddeer.org/gummer.html


or Prime Minister Jean Chretien photo op at lunch eating beef at a Ottawa restaurant, and of course GW is no different, he lies too about the absolute safety of beef from BSE/TSE in the USA and North America;


Politicians claim it's safe to eat beef, but is it?
May 27, 03 Toronto Star by Thomas Walkom

"I want to stress from the beginning, this is one cow," Agriculture Minister Lyle Vanclief said. "This is a problem with one herd and one cow," echoed Prime Minister Jean Chretien, as he tucked into a steak.

snip...

That could mean that Chretien, Alberta Premier Ralph Klein and other politicians who chowed down on steak and hamburger to prove Alberta beef safe were particularly brave. Or it may mean that they figure they will die from something else before the possibility of CJD has a chance to kick in. ...


Bush says he is still eating beef

Reuters, Falfurrias
Friday January 2, 2004
The Guardian


President Bush said last night that Americans should feel comfortable eating beef, despite the country's mad cow scare.
Mr Bush told reporters after a Texas hunting trip that he ate beef yesterday and said he would continue to do so, despite the discovery last month of the first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on a US farm.

He said US agriculture officials, who have banned the use of meat from sick "downer" cattle in foodstuffs, had taken the right steps to ensure the safety of beef. Officials sought to recover meat from eight states that may have received produce from the affected animal.


Asked whether Americans should continue eating beef, Mr Bush said "They should." He added: "I ate beef today and I will continue to eat beef."
The sick animal was discovered almost two weeks ago on a farm in Washington state. More than 20 countries quickly responded by banning the import of US beef.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/bse/article/0,,1115015,00.html

EACH and everyone of these leaders have lied and been the cause of the spreading and exposing of millions to this agent, ALL in the name of free trade, commodities and futures.
ALL these leaders that went along with this junk science i.e. BSE MRR policy, should all be held accountable in a World Tribunal on BSE/TSE with the OIE sitting right there along side of these leaders. THE OIE is just as much to blame. ...TSS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kate Cyrul
Friday, February 3, 2006 (202) 225-3661


DeLauro Questions APHIS Officials over Retesting of Infected Cow

– IG Report finds agency officials overruled advice of field scientists –

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congresswoman Rosa L. DeLauro (Conn.-3) today questioned the reasoning of officials at the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) that overruled the advice of field scientists on the retesting of a domestic cow found to have the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) disease. After the USDA announced that the first case of BSE was identified in a native-born cow last June, officials at APHIS said no further testing of the animal was needed. The USDA’s inspector general, however, determined the testing used proved inconclusive results and said that a sample from the cow should be sent for further testing.

DeLauro is ranking member of the House Appropriations Agriculture subcommittee, which has jurisdiction and oversight responsibilities of USDA and FDA.

“I am concerned that the APHIS officials that reviewed these results seemed to make decisions based not on science, but on the economic ramifications a positive BSE finding in a domestic born animal could have on the U.S. economy,” said DeLauro. “When consumer safety is in question, APHIS should not be forced into additional testing of an inconclusive sample by its inspector general.

“While we are glad that this cow did not enter the human food supply, APHIS officials had a responsibility to further examine this sample that even our “gold standard” test proved inconclusive. By refusing to send samples for further testing, APHIS could have jeopardized consumer health and safety and put the industry at a disadvantage, drawing into question the safety of our beef.

“Today I am requesting that APHIS disclose which officials made this decision and further explain their reasoning for not voluntarily testing this inconclusive sample further.”

###

www.house.gov/delaurotss

http://www.house.gov/delauro/press/2006/February/APHIS_retesting_2_3_06.html


Audit Report Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Surveillance Program – Phase II and Food Safety and
Inspection Service Controls Over BSE Sampling, Specified Risk Materials, and
Advanced Meat Recovery Products - Phase III


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL
Washington, D.C. 20250 January 25, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: 50601-10-KC TO: W.
Ron DeHaven Administrator Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Barbara
Masters Administrator Food Safety and Inspection Service ATTN: William J.
Hudnall Deputy Administrator Marketing Regulatory Program Business Services
William C. Smith Assistant Administrator Office of Program Evaluation,
Enforcement, and Review FROM: Robert W. Young /s/ Assistant Inspector
General for Audit SUBJECT: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service -
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Surveillance Program - Phase II and
Food Safety and Inspection Service - Controls Over BSE Sampling, Specified
Risk Materials, and Advanced Meat Recovery Products - Phase III This report
presents the results of our audit of the enhanced BSE surveillance program
and controls over specified risk materials and advanced meat recovery
products. Your written response to the official draft report, dated January
20, 2006, is included as exhibit G with excerpts of the response and the
Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) position incorporated into the Findings
and Recommendations section of the report, where applicable. We accept the
management decisions for all recommendations. Please follow your agency’s
internal procedures in forwarding documentation for final action to the
Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO). We are providing a separate
memorandum to the agencies and OCFO that provides specific information on
the actions to be completed to achieve final action. We appreciate your
timely response and the cooperation and assistance provided to our staff
during the audit USDA/OIG-A/50601-10-KC/ Page i

Executive Summary

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Surveillance Program - Phase II and Food Safety and
Inspection Service - Controls Over BSE Sampling, Specified Risk Materials,
and Advanced Meat Recovery Products - Phase III

Results in Brief This report evaluates elements of the interlocking
safeguards in place to protect United States (U.S.) beef from Bovine
Spongiform Encephalopathy, widely known as BSE or "mad cow disease." Since
1990, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service (APHIS), has led a multi-agency effort to monitor and
prevent BSE from entering the food supply. After discovering a BSE-positive
cow in December 2003, APHIS expanded its BSE surveillance program. To
further protect the food supply, USDA banned materials identified as being
at risk of carrying BSE (specified risk materials (SRM)), such as central
nervous system tissue. As part of this effort, USDA’s Food Safety and
Inspection Service (FSIS) required beef slaughter and processing facilities
to incorporate controls for handling such materials into their operational
plans. Onsite FSIS inspectors also inspect cattle for clinical signs in
order to prevent diseased animals from being slaughtered for human
consumption. To evaluate the effectiveness of the safeguards, we assessed
APHIS’ implementation of the expanded surveillance program, as well as FSIS’
controls to prevent banned SRMs from entering the food supply.

In June 2004, APHIS implemented its expanded surveillance program;
participation by industry in this surveillance program is voluntary. As of
May 2005, over 350,000 animals were sampled and tested for BSE. To date, two
animals tested positive for BSE; one tested positive after implementation of
the expanded surveillance program.

USDA made significant efforts to implement the expanded BSE surveillance
program. Much needed to be done in a short period of time to establish the
necessary processes, controls, infrastructure, and networks to assist in
this effort. In addition, extensive outreach and coordination was undertaken
with other Federal, State, and local entities, private industry, and
laboratory and veterinary networks. This report provides an assessment as to
the progress USDA made in expanding its surveillance effort and the
effectiveness of its controls and processes. This report also discusses the
limitations of its program and data in assessing the prevalence of BSE in
the U.S. herd.


snip...

40 ELISA test procedures require two additional (duplicate) tests if the
initial test is reactive, before final interpretation. If either of the
duplicate tests is reactive, the test is deemed inconclusive.

41 Protocol for BSE Contract Laboratories to Receive and Test Bovine Brain
Samples and Report Results for BSE Surveillance Standard Operating Procedure
(SOP), dated October 26, 2004.

42 The NVSL conducted an ELISA test on the original material tested at the
contract laboratory and on two new cuts from the sample tissue.

43 A visual examination of brain tissue by a microscope.

44 A localized pathological change in a bodily organ or tissue.

SNIP...


PLEASE SEE FLAMING EVIDENCE THAT THE USDA ET AL COVERED UP MAD COW DISEASE
IN TEXAS ;


PAGE 43;


Section 2. Testing Protocols and Quality Assurance Controls


snip...


FULL TEXT 130 PAGES


http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/50601-10-KC.pdf

[GAO-05-101 ] Mad Cow Disease: FDA's Management of the Feed Ban Has Improved, but Oversight Weaknesses Continue to Limit Program Effectiveness
Size: 104986 , Score: 1000 , TEXT , PDF , SUMMARY


http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi?IPaddress=162.140.64.88&filename=d05101.txt&directory=/diskb/wais/data/gao

[2]

[GAO-05-101 ] Mad Cow Disease: FDA's Management of the Feed Ban Has Improved, but Oversight Weaknesses Continue to Limit Program Effectiveness
Size: 104986 , Score: 1000 , TEXT , PDF , SUMMARY

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi?IPaddress=162.140.64.88&filename=d05101.txt&directory=/diskb/wais/data/gao

[Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food and Requirement for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

03-025IFA
03-025IFA-2
Terry S. Singeltary


Page 1 of 17

From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder9@verizon.net]

Sent: Thursday, September 08, 2005 6:17 PM

To: fsis.regulationscomments@fsis.usda.gov

Subject: [Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food and Requirements

for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

Greetings FSIS,

I would kindly like to submit the following to [Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food and

Requirements for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

THE BSE/TSE SUB CLINICAL Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

Broken bones and such may be the first signs of a sub clinical BSE/TSE Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle ;

SUB CLINICAL PRION INFECTION

MRC-43-00

Issued: Monday, 28 August 2000

NEW EVIDENCE OF SUB-CLINICAL PRION INFECTION: IMPORTANT RESEARCH

FINDINGS RELEVANT TO CJD AND BSE


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

P.O. Box 42

Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

9/13/2005

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IFA/03-025IFA-2.pdf

TSS



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