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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: Pennsylvania Game Commission Law and Law Makers Message Board HUNTING PA.COM BANS SPEAKING ABOUT CWD
Date: December 25, 2005 at 2:07 pm PST

In Reply to: Pennsylvania Game Commission Law and Law Makers Message Board HUNTING PA.COM BANS SPEAKING ABOUT CWD posted by TSS on December 21, 2005 at 8:37 am:

We cannot proceed.
Your account has been banned or locked.
Ban reason:

Please use your back button to return to the previous page.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." ; "GM, PGCNEWS"

Cc: "Jerry Feaser"
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2005 5:31 PM
Subject: Re: Pennsylvania Game Commission - State Wildlife Management Agency
eAlert: Newsroom

> By the way, Joe Neville said he will see if he can find out why your info
> was deleted


thank you!

i still cannot figure it out. i have posted nothing obscene, abusive, just
data on TSEs, all with references. i don't think i even ranted much. there
were many things deleted? the second round of deletions was nothing but cwd
postings from PA and NM and recent data on CJD from gambetti et al here in
the USA, the latest from Aguzzi et al i also posted. i can't believe it was
deleted??? please advise, is the board there just off limits for me posting
about CWD and or everyone? what about the other boards, cant post about CWD
there either? how else are hunters going to learn about this agent if we
cannot speak of it??? i have wasted daily, 8 years of my life trying to
educate hunters and cattleman, and most of the time they appreciate it. i
have failed with the FDA/USDA et al to the most extent.
but this is unbelievable. again, a new low..................

kind regards,
terry

----- Original Message -----
From: "GM, PGCNEWS"
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2005 11:20 AM
Subject: RE: Pennsylvania Game Commission - State Wildlife Management Agency
eAlert: Newsroom


By the way, Joe Neville said he will see if he can find out why your info
was deleted.

-----Original Message-----
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [mailto:flounder9@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2005 12:16 PM
To: Jerry Feaser
Cc: Jerry Feaser
Subject: Re: Pennsylvania Game Commission - State Wildlife Management
Agency eAlert: Newsroom


Greetings Jerry,

whether you know about this or not, or even care. i have done nothing wrong
to be banned from posting about cwd. this is very disturbing?

kind regards,
terry

Subject: Pennsylvania Game Commission Law and Law Makers Message Board
HUNTING PA.COM BANS SPEAKING ABOUT CWD
Date: December 21, 2005 at 8:37 am PST

Greetings State of PA hunters et al,

SEEMS Big Brother is working everywhere these days. after 8 years of trying
to warn hunters about CWD on many boards in many states, i find a new low in
the state of PA. Banning and deleting postings TSS or anyone from speaking
about CWD evidently. the only thing i ever posted was the latest on CWD from
some of the top peer review papers to date, and some old confidential data
(with references and sources pdf files) for all to see. but evidently, after
just trying to warn these hunters, and have been since Sept. 2002 with not
one complaint waged against me that i am aware of, the Pennsylvania Game
Commission Law and Law Makers board has banned me from speaking about CWD.
NOT only on that board, but any board at ;

http://www.huntingpa.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php?Cat=


i suppose if they just bury there heads in the sand and don't speak about
it, it will go away. good luck. ...TSS


Welcome Terry S. Singeltary Sr.. [Logout]

Law and Law Makers Message Board >> Pennsylvania Game Commission


Pages: 1
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
member


Reged: Sep 17 2002
Posts: 129
Loc: TEXAS CWD IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN CARCASS PARTS BAN
#513483 - Mon Dec 19 2005 03:59 PM


Release #143-05

GAME COMMISSION BANS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN CARCASS PARTS FROM STATES WITH
CWD

Using newly-granted emergency powers, Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive
Director Vern Ross today issued an order banning the importation of specific
carcass parts from states and Canadian provinces where CWD had been
identified in free-ranging cervid populations.

The ban closely mirrors a similar ban issued on Sept. 21 by the state
Department of Agriculture, with the support of the Game Commission.
Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff used his emergency powers to issue the
ban pending action by the Board of Game Commissioners to grant similar
emergency powers to the agency's executive director.

"With chronic wasting disease (CWD) present in free-ranging and captive
wildlife populations in 14 states and two Canadian provinces, we must act
responsibly and clearly to protect our wild and captive populations of deer
and elk, as well as other cervid family members," Ross said. "This ban
applies to carcass parts from deer, elk or other cervids susceptible to CWD
taken from the wild or from captive facilities in those states where CWD has
been found in wild herds.

"There are many scientific unknowns about CWD, so this order may need to be
altered in the future based on new discoveries, as well as new states that
find CWD within their borders or other species that prove susceptible to the
disease."

For more information, please visit the Pennsylvania Game Commission - State
Wildlife Management Agency website:
http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=11&Q=166946


TSS


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
member


Reged: Sep 17 2002
Posts: 129
Loc: TEXAS

Greetings Samuel and Hunters of PA,

i will no longer be able to post here for reasons posted below. sorry for
making the posting above. i had not seen this yet. ... good luck...tss


Welcome Terry S. Singeltary Sr.. [Logout] My Home · Main Index · Search ·
Active Topics
Who's Online · FAQ · User List · Calendar


CWD Postings.

From: Samuel

Terry,


I have to request that you discontinue from posting information on CWD. I
have received concerns from individuals on the validity of your information.
Since I am not educated on the subject, I cannot validate that the
information is correct and or factual. As time moves on, this subject will
become quite a "touchy subject" and any information, factual or not, will be
scrutinized. From now on, we will have to rely on the PGC to educate the
residents here in PA on the subject.

Thank you for your concern in this matter and keeping a close vigil on the
topic.

Samuel
===========================


Reged: Sep 17 2002
Posts: 132
Loc: TEXAS POSTINGS AND DISCUSSIONS ON CWD HERE
#514778 - Wed Dec 21 2005 11:26 AM


Greetings PA Hunters,

I have been ask not to post anymore here about CWD.
SO, i will adhere to there request. i really have no other alternative. i
would like to say, this is very disturbing to me, and should be very
concerning for you hunters. i have been researching this for almost 8 years
and this is the only
state that has banned me from posting about TSE. Big Brother is working
everywhere, including this board. ...TSS


From: Samuel
Your post was deleted due to it being a double post. The press release is
posted in the PGC Press Release Thread.

Like I had asked you, please refrain from posting information on CWD.

Thank you.


=========================

Pennsylvania Game Commission Law and Law Makers Message Board HUNTING PA.COM

TSS

==============================


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
#####################

New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
Public contact: (505) 476-8000
dan.williams@state.nm.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, DEC. 9, 2005:

TWO NEW MEXICO ELK TEST POSITIVE FOR CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE

SANTA FE - Two elk killed in the southern Sacramento Mountains of southeast
New Mexico have tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), the
Department of Game and Fish announced. The animals were the first elk in New
Mexico to test positive for CWD since the disease was first discovered in
mule deer in 2002.

Both CWD-afflicted elk were killed in an area 10 to 15 miles southeast of
Cloudcroft in Game Management Unit 34, the same general area where the
state's most recent case of CWD was detected in a mule deer. One of the
elk - a mature male -- was taken Oct. 3 by a hunter and showed no symptoms
of the disease. The other elk - a yearling female -- was in very poor
condition and unable to stand when a Department of Game and Fish
conservation officer found it Oct. 1. Testing and verification of the
samples required about two months. Future testing is expected to occur more
quickly as the Department of Game and Fish and the Veterinary Diagnostic
Services in the New Mexico Department of Agriculture further implement
recently achieved in-state CWD testing capabilities.

"The range in which the disease is found appears to be expanding, so finding
it in more animals in that area is not surprising," said Kerry Mower, the
Department's lead wildlife disease biologist. "But it is disappointing to
find our first cases of CWD in free-ranging elk."

Brain stem samples from the two elk were among more than 100 taken from deer
and elk in Unit 34 this year and sent to the Veterinary Diagnostic Services
Laboratory in Albuquerque. The Albuquerque laboratory's "presumptive
positive" samples from the two elk were confirmed as CWD-positive by the
National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

"We will continue our efforts to monitor the disease by actively testing
animals in Units 34 and 19," Mower said. "We also encourage all hunters
statewide to submit their animals for testing." The Department personally
informs hunters if the tests are positive. Hunters will be able to see the
complete list of test results as they become available on the Department Web
site, www.wildlife.state.nm.us .

This season, hunters who kill animals in a "Control Area" of Unit 34 are
required to submit their animals for testing and observe special regulations
affecting which body parts of a deer or elk can be removed from the unit.
Hunting seasons continue in that area into January.

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological illness that afflicts deer,
elk and moose. There is no evidence of CWD being transmitted to humans or
livestock. The disease causes animals to become emaciated, display abnormal
behavior and lose control of bodily functions. To date, it has been found in
captive and wild deer, elk and moose in eight states and two Canadian
provinces.

The origin of CWD in New Mexico is unknown. It has been found in 12 wild
deer and two wild elk since 2002, when the disease was first discovered east
of Las Cruces. All of the CWD-positive deer and elk in New Mexico were from
the southern Sacramento Mountains southeast of Cloudcroft and areas
surrounding the Organ Mountains near Las Cruces.

For more information about CWD in New Mexico, including special regulations
and how hunters can assist in research and prevention, visit the Department
Web site at www.wildlife.state.nm.us . More information about CWD also can
be found on the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance site at www.cwd-info.org/
or on the Colorado Division of Wildlife site at
http://wildlife.state.co.us/.

###

http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/publications/press_releases/documents/10-9cw
delk.htm

CWD CONTROL MAP NM

http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/documents/cwdcontrolmap.pdf


TSS
----- Original Message -----
From: "ProMED-mail"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2005 11:32 AM
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM)


> CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE, CERVIDS - USA (NEW MEXICO)
> ***************************************************
> A ProMED-mail post
>
> ProMED-mail is a program of the
> International Society for Infectious Diseases
>
>
> Date: 24 Jun 2005
> From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
> Source: New Mexico Wildlife News, Mon, 27 Jun 2005 [edited]
>
>
>
> 2 Mule Deer Test Positive For Chronic Wasting Disease
> ---------------------------------------------------
> 2 mule deer captured in the Organ Mountains as part of an ongoing
> research project near White Sands Missile Range have tested positive
> for chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal neurological disease that
> attacks the brains of infected deer and elk, the Department of Game
> and Fish announced.
>
> The number of confirmed CWD cases in New Mexico now stands at 11
> since 2002, when the disease was first confirmed in a deer found near
> the eastern foothills of the Organ Mountains. All 11 CWD-infected
> deer were found in the same general area of southern New Mexico. The
> origin of the disease in New Mexico remains unknown. The carcasses of
> the infected deer will be incinerated, said Kerry Mower, the
> Department's lead wildlife disease biologist.
>
> Mower said the most recent CWD-positive deer showed no obvious
> physical signs of having the disease. They were captured in April
> 2005 and tested as part of a 3-year-old research project studying
> deer population dynamics in southern New Mexico. More than 140 deer
> have been captured alive and tested for the study, in which
> researchers hope to find the cause of a 10-year decline in the area
> deer population. Study participants include the Department of Game
> and Fish, the U.S. Army at White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss,
> Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Geological Survey at New Mexico State
> University, and San Andres National Wildlife Refuge.
>
> Hunters can assist the Department in its CWD research and prevention
> efforts by bringing their fresh, legally harvested deer or elk head
> to an area office, where officers will remove the brain stem for
> testing. Participants will be eligible for drawings for an oryx hunt
> on White Sands Missile Range and a trophy elk hunt on the Valle
> Vidal. For more information about the drawing and chronic wasting
> disease, visit the Department web site at
>
>
> See map:
>
>
> --
> ProMED-mail
>
>
> [Members are strongly encouraged to view the NM CWD map at the URL
> below. In 2004 they tested 997 deer, each shown. These recent deer
> are clustered with the others just to the east of Las Cruces in
> southern New Mexico. The absence of cases elsewhere in the state at
> this level of surveillance increases one's confidence in the reality
> of this specific high-risk area. The origin of their infection is
> still obscure.
>
> The New Mexico CWD website is:
>
>
> Unfortunately, other than their admirable map, they have not been
> updated since 14 Jun 2004.
>
> The site being close to Texas and to Mexico has spawned speculation,
> but as yet without foundation. In the past 3 years Texas has tested
> some 9103 deer out of a target population estimate of 3 917 926, all
> negative. For details of the Texas Chronic Wasting Management Plan,
> go to:
>
> or the Texas Animal Health Commission CWD website:
>
> - Mod.MHJ]
>
> [see also:
> 2003
> ----
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM) (02) 20030217.0414
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM) 20030207.0328
> 2002
> ----
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (New Mexico) (02) 20020620.4548
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (New Mexico) 20020619.4535]
> ...............................................lm/mhj/pg/lm
>
>
> *##########################################################*
> ************************************************************
> ProMED-mail makes every effort to verify the reports that
> are posted, but the accuracy and completeness of the
> information, and of any statements or opinions based
> thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in
> using information posted or archived by ProMED-mail. ISID
> and its associated service providers shall not be held
> responsible for errors or omissions or held liable for any
> damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon posted
> or archived material.
> ************************************************************
> Visit ProMED-mail's web site at .
> Send all items for posting to: promed@promedmail.org
> (NOT to an individual moderator). If you do not give your
> full name and affiliation, it may not be posted. Send
> commands to subscribe/unsubscribe, get archives, help,
> etc. to: majordomo@promedmail.org. For assistance from a
> human being send mail to: owner-promed@promedmail.org.
> ############################################################
> ############################################################
>

#################### https://lists.aegee.org/bse-l.html
####################


CJD (NEW VAR.) UPDATE 2005 (11)
*******************************
A ProMED-mail post

ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases

Sponsored in part by Elsevier, publisher of
International Journal of Infectious Disease

[The UK Department of Health website has been revised and the monthly
new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease statistics are now appended to
the table "Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK by Calendar Year
(since 1990)" and can be downloaded from the monthly statistics
website. The definition of the designations deaths, definite cases,
probable vCJD cases, and, the case definitions can be found by
accessing the Department of Health website, or, by reference to a
previous ProMED-mail post in this thread (for example, CJD (new var.)
- UK: update Mar 2002 20020305.3693)

Data on vCJD cases from all parts of the world are now included in
these updates. Also data on other forms of CJD (sporadic, iatrogenic,
familial, and GSS) are now included where they have some relevance to
the incidence and etiology of vCJD. - Mod.CP]

In this update:

[1] UK: DH vCJD Monthly Statistics - as of Fri 4 Nov 2005
[2] UK: SEAC position paper - 19 Oct 2005
[3] USA: New scrapie agent
[4] USA: Experimental transmission of CWD to primates
[5] Italy: Prions suspected in sheep milk

*****
[1] UK: DH vCJD Monthly Statistics - as of Fri 4 Nov 2005
Date: Mon 7 Nov 2005
From: ProMED-mail
Source: UK Department of Health, Monthly Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Statistics, Press release no.2005/0389, Mon 7 Nov 2005 [edited]
otices/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=3D4122740&chk=3Dg795Rg>


Monthly Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Statistics - As of 4 Nov 2005
--------------------------------------------------
The Department of Health is today [Mon 7 Nov 2005] issuing the latest
information about the numbers of known cases of Creutzfeldt Jakob
disease. This includes cases of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease
[abbreviated in ProMED-mail as CJD (new var.) or vCJD] - the form of
the disease thought to be linked to BSE. The position is as follows:

Definite and probable CJD cases in the UK:

Summary of vCJD Cases - Deaths
------------------------------

Deaths from definite vCJD (confirmed): 108

Deaths from probable vCJD (without neuropathological confirmation): 43

Deaths from probable vCJD (neuropathological confirmation pending): 1

Number of deaths from definite or probable vCJD (as above): 152

Summary of vCJD Cases - Alive
-----------------------------

Number of probable vCJD cases still alive: 6

Total
-----

Number of definite or probable vCJD (dead and alive): 158

(The next table will be published on Mon 5 Dec 2005)

[Since the previous monthly statistics were released on Fri 30 Sep
2005, the total number of deaths from definite or probable vCJD has
increased by one. This is accounted for by the death of one of the
surviving probable cases. Consequently the overall total number of
definite or probable vCJD cases (dead and alive) has increased by one
and is now 158.

These data are consistent with the view that the vCJD outbreak in the
UK is now in decline. The number of deaths due to definite or
probable vCJD in the UK during the first 9 months of 2005 is now 4.
The peak number of deaths was 28 in the year 2000, followed by 20 in
2001, 17 in 2002, 18 in 2003, and 9 in 2004. - Mod.CP]

--
ProMED-mail

[As of 30 Sep 2005, so far in the UK for the year 2005 there have
been 92 referrals of suspected CJD; there have been 41 deaths from
sporadic CJD, 2 from familial CJD, one from iatrogenic CJD and 3 from
vCJD. Data for all years since 1990 can be downloaded from this
web-site.

I am indebted to Terry S. Singeltary Sr. for
drawing my attention to similar data concerning CJD surveillance in
the USA, which are being compiled by the National Prion Disease
Pathology Surveillance Center at Case Western Reserve University
beginning from the year 1997 (. The
corresponding figures for the USA for the year 2005 up to the end of
September are: 256 referrals of suspected CJD, which include 46 cases
of sporadic CJD, 22 cases of familial CJD, none of iatrogenic CJD,
and none of vCJD. Another 52 cases have been diagnosed as prion
diseases with precise identification pending.

Since 1997 in the USA there have been 876 confirmed cases of sporadic
CJD, 159 cases of familial CJD, 15 cases of iatrogenic CJD, and one
case of vCJD (almost certainly acquired in the UK). No cases of GSS
(Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker) syndrome have been diagnosed in the
USA since the inception of surveillance in 1997.

The corresponding totals for confirmed diagnoses in the UK since 1990
are 805 sporadic cases, 46 familial cases, 49 iatrogenic cases, 24
GSS cases, and 151 vCJD cases. The reasons for the discrepancies in
the frequencies, vCJD apart, are unknown. - Mod.CP]

******
[2] UK: SEAC position paper - 19 Oct 2005
Date: Wed 19 Oct 2005
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Source: Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC), Position
Paper, 19 Oct 2005 [edited]


Hypothesis that BSE Originated from a Human TSE
-----------------------------------------------
Issue
-----
1. Consideration of a hypothesis that BSE (bovine spongiform
encephalopathy) was originally derived from a human TSE
(transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) [see: part 4 of the
ProMED-mail post archived as "CJD (new var.) update 2005 (09)
20050905.2627"].

Background
----------
2. The origins of BSE are unknown. Since the discovery of BSE, the
Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC) and others have
considered a number of hypotheses about the origins of the disease.
[,
]

Recently a further hypothesis has been considered by SEAC, which
suggests that BSE may have arisen as a result of UK importation, in
the 1960s and 1970s, of mammalian bone and carcass material from the
Indian subcontinent, for use in animal feed. Furthermore, this
hypothesis suggests that this material may have been contaminated
with human remains harbouring a strain of CJD (Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Disease), which could have been transmitted to cattle [Colchester AC,
Colchester NT (2005). The origin of bovine spongiform encephalopathy:
the human prion disease hypothesis. Lancet. 366, 856-61.]

Contamination of animal feed with human remains
-----------------------------------------------
3. It is not possible to establish with any certainty whether feed
given to animals in the 1960s and 1970s was contaminated with human
remains. However it is possible that carcass material, which may have
inadvertently included human remains, was imported into the UK from
the Indian subcontinent (particularly the Ganges region) during that
period, and used in animal feed. Professor Colchester provides
indirect evidence to suggest that this may have occurred.

4. It is likely that similar material was imported into other
countries, such as Australia, that have not detected BSE in their
livestock. Furthermore, the amount of human remains that may have
contaminated animal feed would have been a very small fraction of the
amount of sheep and cattle material that was incorporated into animal
feed in the past. Thus, there was a much greater opportunity for
cattle to have been exposed to an animal TSE rather than a human TSE.
Current control measures implemented across the EU and in the UK have
prevented the importation of such material for either animal feed or
fertilizer.

Properties of BSE and other TSEs
--------------------------------
5. BSE may have originated as a result of misfolding of the prion
protein in cattle, the amplification via feed of a rare, new
spontaneous mutation in cattle, or transmission of a TSE from another
species. There are barriers to transmission from one host species to
another, and there appears to be an appreciable barrier to
transmission between cattle and humans. It is not currently possible
to predict the ability, or likelihood, of transmission between
species based on current understanding of strain characteristics.

6. Prion strains can be characterised by their properties in
biochemical and infectivity tests. Generally, prion strains are
transformed as a result of transmission to a new host, with
consequent changes in their biochemical properties. However, BSE is
somewhat unusual in that it appears to retain its strain
characteristics when passaged through a new host. Experiments in
transgenic mice expressing human, bovine and ovine forms of the prion
protein gene have been designed to determine the likelihood of a
strain passing to a new host but can also shed light on possible
relationships between prion strains.

7. Nevertheless it is difficult, and often impossible with current
technologies, to establish whether one strain is related to another
following transmission to another species. It may therefore, never be
possible to determine the true origin of BSE.

Summary of SEAC's discussion
----------------------------
8. SEAC considered it unlikely that the origins of BSE would ever be
determined conclusively.

9. It is not possible to determine, from current knowledge of the
characteristics of prion strains, whether BSE originated from CJD or
other animal prion strains.

10. There was evidence to suggest that human remains may have been
included in animal feed derived from the Indian subcontinent in the
past, and the hypothesis presented by Professor Colchester was
therefore considered plausible, but ultimately untestable.

11. Very much larger quantities of cattle and sheep remains
historically had entered animal feed, compared with putative human
remains. There is also likely to be a significant species barrier
between humans and cattle, as there is known to be such a barrier in
the opposite direction. It is therefore very much more likely that
the origins of BSE are related to a TSE that originated in cattle or
sheep, rather than a TSE from humans.

12. In conclusion, although Professor Colchester's hypothesis can
never be ruled out, SEAC considered that, on the balance of
possibilities, human TSE-contaminated material in animal feed was
unlikely to have been the origin of BSE.

13. Although further experiments suggested by Professor Colchester
would be of some scientific interest, SEAC did not consider them
essential, as they are unlikely to yield conclusive results on the
origin of BSE, and because current control measures now prevent
possible transmission via the route proposed in this hypothesis.

--
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

*******
[3] USA: New scrapie agent
Date: Thu 20 Oct 2005
From: ProMED-mail
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
10.1073/pnas.0502296102 [edited]


A paper entitled "A newly identified type of scrapie agent can
naturally infect sheep with resistant PrP genotypes", published in
PNAS online on 20 Oct 2005, describes observations that support the
view that a truly infectious TSE agent, unrecognized until recently,
infects sheep and goat flocks. (The authors of the paper are Annick
Le Dur (1), Vincent Beringue (1), Olivier Andreoletti , Fabienne
Reine (1), Thanh Lan Lai (1), Thierry Baron , Bjorn Bratberg (3),
Jean-Luc Vilotte (2), Pierre Sarradin (4), Sylvie L. Benestad (3),
and Hubert Laude (1)

(1) Virologie Immunologie Moleculaires and (2) Genetique Biochimique
et Cytogenetique, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique,
78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France; Unite Mixte de Recherche, Institut
National de la Recherche Agronomique-Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de
Toulouse, Interactions Hote Agent Pathogene, 31066 Toulouse, France;
Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Aliments, Unite Agents
Transmissibles Non Conventionnels, 69364 Lyon, France; (4) Pathologie
Infectieuse et Immunologie, Institut National de la Recherche
Agronomique, 37380 Nouzilly, France; and (3) Department of Pathology,
National Veterinary Institute, 0033 Oslo, Norway

The Abstract of the paper reads as follows: "Scrapie in small
ruminants belongs to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies
(TSEs), or prion diseases, a family of fatal neurodegenerative
disorders that affect humans and animals and can transmit within and
between species by ingestion or inoculation. Conversion of the
host-encoded prion protein (PrP), normal cellular PrP (PrPc), into a
misfolded form, abnormal PrP (PrPSc), plays a key role in TSE
transmission and pathogenesis. The intensified surveillance of
scrapie in the European Union, together with the improvement of PrPSc
detection techniques, has led to the discovery of a growing number of
so-called atypical scrapie cases. These include clinical Nor98 cases
first identified in Norwegian sheep on the basis of unusual
pathological and PrPSc molecular features and "cases" that produced
discordant responses in the rapid tests currently applied to the
large-scale random screening of slaughtered or fallen animals.
Worryingly, !
a substantial proportion of such cases involved sheep with PrP
genotypes known until now to confer natural resistance to
conventional scrapie. Here we report that both Nor98 and discordant
cases, including 3 sheep homozygous for the resistant PrPARR allele
(A136R154R171), efficiently transmitted the disease to transgenic
mice expressing ovine PrP, and that they shared unique biological and
biochemical features upon propagation in mice. These observations
support the view that a truly infectious TSE agent, unrecognized
until recently, infects sheep and goat flocks and may have important
implications in terms of scrapie control and public health."

--
ProMED-mail

[These findings need to be considered in the context of current
attempts to breed scrapie-resistant sheep and protection of the human
food supply chain. - Mod.CP]

******
[4] USA: Experimental transmission of CWD to primates
Date: Thu 20 Oct 2005
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Source: Journal of Virology, 79,21.13794-13796 2005 [edited]
=hits>


The following paper published in the November issue of the Journal of
Virology reports experimental transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease
(CWD) prions to a primate species. The paper is entitled Interspecies
Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions to Squirrel Monkeys
(_Saimiri sciureus_). The authors are: Richard F. Marsh (1)
(Deceased), Anthony E. Kincaid (2), Richard A. Bessen (3), and Jason
C. Bartz(4)*, at the Department of Animal Health and Biomedical
Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706(1), Department of
Physical Therapy(2), Department of Medical Microbiology and
Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska 68178(4),
Department of Veterinary Molecular Biology, Montana State University,
Bozeman, Montana 59718(3).

The Abstract reads as follows: "Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an
emerging prion disease of deer and elk. The risk of CWD transmission
to humans following exposure to CWD-infected tissues is unknown. To
assess the susceptibility of nonhuman primates to CWD, 2 squirrel
monkeys were inoculated with brain tissue from a CWD-infected mule
deer. The CWD-inoculated squirrel monkeys developed a progressive
neurodegenerative disease and were euthanized at 31 and 34 months
postinfection. Brain tissue from the CWD-infected squirrel monkeys
contained the abnormal isoform of the prion protein, PrP-res, and
displayed spongiform degeneration. This is the 1st reported
transmission of CWD to primates."

--
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

******
[5] Italy: Prions suspected in sheep milk
Date: Tue 8 Nov 2005
From: ProMED-mail
Source: News@nature.com, 3 Nov 2005 [edited]


Could sheep pass a fatal brain disease between them through their
milk? The inflamed mammary glands of sheep have been found to contain
protein particles that cause scrapie, a sickness similar to mad cow
disease. This suggests that the suspect proteins, called prions, may
also be present in the milk of infected animals. If prions exist in
the milk of cows infected with both an inflammatory illness and mad
cow disease, formally known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy
(BSE), this raises concerns for human health. Consumption of
prion-contaminated meat from cows with BSE is believed to cause the
fatal variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in people; so might
contaminated milk.

Adriano Aguzzi, the lead researcher on the study, has not detected
prions in milk itself, because it is difficult to analyse for the
abnormal proteins. But he says he expects to find them. "It is
unlikely that the prions are not in the milk," says Aguzzi, a
pathologist at the University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland. "And
the prospect is not a pleasant one." Neil Cashman, a prion researcher
at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, is worried too.
People have looked for prions in the milk of cows with BSE and
haven't found any, he says. "But they haven't looked in cows with
mammary-gland infection and BSE. This raises very serious questions,"
concludes Cashman.

Prions are mainly found in the brain, spinal cord and immune system.
Until recently, other body parts were thought to be relatively safe.
But in a series of studies, Aguzzi's group has shown that prions can
be present in other organs as well, provided that these organs are
inflamed. Earlier in 2005, his group found prions in inflamed
pancreases, livers and kidneys. A study [in October 2005] showed that
the urine produced by inflamed kidneys in mice also contains prions.
All this has helped to solve the mystery of how wild herds of elk and
deer, which are vegetarian, might manage to contract prion diseases
from each other. And it prompted Aguzzi to look at mammary glands to
see if they could carry prions too.

The researchers went to Sardinia, a Mediterranean island with more
than a million sheep, and analysed 261 sheep that were genetically
susceptible to scrapie. Of those, 7 had scrapie, and 4 also had an
infection of their mammary glands. All these 4 had prions in their
mammary glands; the others did not. The study appears this week in
Nature Medicine [Ligios C., et al. Nature Medicine, 11. 1137 - 1138
(2005)]. The mammary-gland infections were caused by a virus called
Maedi Visna [_Visna/Maedi virus_ is an ovine retrovirus, classified
in the genus _Lentivirus_, that includes HIV and other
immunodeficiency viruses. - Mod.CP]. Aguzzi says that if this
prion-virus combination is common, it may be a clue to how to fight
the transmission of scrapie. "Maybe to eradicate scrapie you have to
eradicate the virus first," Aguzzi says.

The prion concentration in the sheep's mammary glands is thousands of
times lower than in the brain, says Aguzzi. This is probably good
news, although it is not known how many prions it takes to cause vCJD
in humans.

[Byline: Andreas von Bubnoff]

--
ProMED-mail


[Elsevier reference:
Ena, J. Prions: Who Should Worry about Them? Archives of Medical
Research, 2005, 36:622-7.
rsion=4&_returnURL=&_method=citationSearch&_version=1&_volkey=01884409%2336%
23622%236&md5=0c220d39ac960f5b2f5fe76d5559f7b9>]

[see also:
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (10) 20051006.2916
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (09) 20050905.2627
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (08) 20050801.2237
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (07) 20050703.1889
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (06) 20050607.1584
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (05) 20050505.1243
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (04) 20050405.0982
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (03) 20050308.0687
CJD (new var.) update 2005 (02) 20050211.0467
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2005 (01) 20050111.0095
2004
----
CJD, genetic susceptibility 20041112.3064
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (14) 20041206.3242
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (13) 20041103.2977
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (12) 20041023.2871
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (11) 20041008.2758
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (10) 20040909.2518
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (09) 20040809.2199
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (08) 20040806.2150
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (07) 20040706.1807
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (06) 20040608.1535
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (05) 20040510.1262
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (04) 20040406.0937
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (03) 20040314.0713
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (02) 20040202.0400
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2004 (01) 20040106.0064
CJD (new var.) - France: 8th case 20041022.2864
CJD (new var.) - France: 9th case 20041123.3138
CJD (new var.), blood supply - UK 20040318.0758
CJD (new var.), carrier frequency study - UK 20040521.1365
2003
----
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2003 (13) 20031216.3072
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 2003 (01) 20030108.0057
2002
----
CJD (new var.) - UK: update Dec 2002 20021207.5997

CJD (new var.) - UK: update Jan 2002 20020111.3223
2001
----
CJD (new var.), incidence & trends - UK (02) 20011124.2875
CJD (new var.), incidence & trends - UK 20011115.2816
CJD (new var.) - UK: reassessment 20011029.2671
CJD (new var.) - UK: update Oct 2001 20011005.2419
CJD (new var.) - UK: regional variation (02) 20010907.2145
CJD (new var.) - UK: update Sep 2001 20010906.2134
CJD (new var.) - UK: update Aug 2001 20010808.1872
CJD (new var.) - UK: 9th Annual Report 20010628.1231
CJD (new var.) - UK: update June 2001 20010622.1188
CJD (new var.) - UK: update 3 Jan 2001 20010104.0025]
...................cp/pg/lm

*##########################################################*
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[Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk
Materials for Human Food and Requirement for the Disposition of
Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

03-025IFA
03-025IFA-2
Terry S. Singeltary


Page 1 of 17

From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder9@verizon.net]

Sent: Thursday, September 08, 2005 6:17 PM

To: fsis.regulationscomments@fsis.usda.gov

Subject: [Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified
Risk Materials for Human Food and Requirements

for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

Greetings FSIS,

I would kindly like to submit the following to [Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS
Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food and

Requirements for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

THE BSE/TSE SUB CLINICAL Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

Broken bones and such may be the first signs of a sub clinical BSE/TSE
Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle ;

snip...FULL TEXT ;


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IFA/03-025IFA-2.pdf


Importation of Whole Cuts of Boneless Beef from Japan [Docket No. 05-004-1]
RIN 0579-AB93 TSS SUBMISSION


http://docket.epa.gov/edkfed/do/EDKStaffItemDetailView?objectId=090007d48099
3808

http://docket.epa.gov/edkfed/do/EDKStaffAttachDownloadPDF?objectId=090007d48
0993808

http://docket.epa.gov/edkfed/do/EDKStaffCollectionDetailView?objectId=0b0007
d48096b40d

========================================================

========================================================

OLD TSS SUBMISSIONS;

Docket No, 04-047-l Regulatory Identification No. (RIN) 091O-AF46 NEW BSE
SAFEGUARDS (comment submission)

https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/0/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08
d?OpenDocument


Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?O
penDocument&AutoFramed


Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From Use in

Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed

Comment Number: EC -10

Accepted - Volume 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html

PART 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html

PDF]Freas, William TSS SUBMISSION

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat -

Page 1. J Freas, William From: Sent: To: Subject: Terry S. Singeltary

Sr. [flounder@wt.net] Monday, January 08,200l 3:03 PM freas ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3681s2_09.pdf

Asante/Collinge et al, that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine

genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable

from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm

Docket Management Docket: 96N-0417 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice
in Manufacturing, Packing, or Holding Dietary Ingredients a
Comment Number: EC -2
Accepted - Volume 7

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Mar03/031403/96N-0417-EC-2.htm


[PDF] Appendices to PL107-9 Inter-agency Working Group Final Report 1-1
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
Agent, Weapons of Mass Destruction Operations Unit Federal Bureau of
those who provided comments in response to Docket No. ...
Meager 8/18/01 Terry S. Singeltary Sr ...


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/pubs/pubs/PL107-9_Appen.pdf

Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION
TO DOCKET 2003N-0312]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

# Docket No: 02-088-1 RE-Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of
2002; [TSS SUBMISSION ON POTENTIAL FOR BSE/TSE & FMD 'SUITCASE BOMBS'] -
TSS 1/27/03 (0)

Docket Management

Docket: 02N-0276 - Bioterrorism Preparedness; Registration of Food
Facilities, Section 305
Comment Number: EC-254 [TSS SUBMISSION]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0276/02N-0276-EC-254.htm


Dockets Entered On October 2, 2003 Table of Contents, Docket #,
Title, 1978N-0301,

OTC External Analgesic Drug Products, ... EMC 7, Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Vol #: 1, ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/oct03/100203/100203.htm


Daily Dockets Entered on 02/05/03

DOCKETS ENTERED on 2/5/03. ... EMC 4 Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Vol#: 2.
... Vol#: 1.

03N-0009 Federal Preemption of State & Local Medical Device Requireme. ...


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Feb03/020503/020503.htm


Docket Management

Docket: 02N-0370 - Neurological Devices; Classification of Human Dura Mater

Comment Number: EC -1

Accepted - Volume 1


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be11.html


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004bdfe.html


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004bdfc.html


Daily Dockets - 04/10/03

... 00D-1662 Use of Xenotransplantation Products in Humans.
EMC 98 Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Vol#: 3. 01F ...
http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Apr03/041003/041003.htm -
05-20-2003
- Cached


2003D-0186
Guidance for Industry: Use of Material From Deer and Elk In Animal Feed


EMC 1
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Vol #:
1

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jun03/060903/060903.htm


2003D-0186
Guidance for Industry: Use of Material From Deer and Elk In Animal Feed


EMC 7
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Vol #:
1

2003D-0186
Guidance for Industry: Use of Material From Deer and Elk In Animal Feed


EMC 7
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Vol #:
1


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/oct03/100203/100203.htm

01N-0423 Substances Prohibited from use in animal food/Feed Ruminant

APE 5 National Renderers Association, Inc. Vol#: 2

APE 6 Animal Protein Producers Industry Vol#: 2

APE 7 Darling International Inc. Vol#: 2

EMC 1 Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Vol#: 3

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/01/Oct01/101501/101501.htm

Send Post-Publication Peer Review to journal:


Re: RE-Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob

disease in the United States


Email Terry S. Singeltary:


flounder@wt.net

I lost my mother to hvCJD (Heidenhain Variant CJD). I would like to

comment on the CDC's attempts to monitor the occurrence of emerging

forms of CJD. Asante, Collinge et al [1] have reported that BSE

transmission to the 129-methionine genotype can lead to an alternate

phenotype that is indistinguishable from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest

sporadic CJD. However, CJD and all human TSEs are not reportable

nationally. CJD and all human TSEs must be made reportable in every

state and internationally. I hope that the CDC does not continue to

expect us to still believe that the 85%+ of all CJD cases which are

sporadic are all spontaneous, without route/source. We have many TSEs in

the USA in both animal and man. CWD in deer/elk is spreading rapidly and

CWD does transmit to mink, ferret, cattle, and squirrel monkey by

intracerebral inoculation. With the known incubation periods in other

TSEs, oral transmission studies of CWD may take much longer. Every

victim/family of CJD/TSEs should be asked about route and source of this

agent. To prolong this will only spread the agent and needlessly expose

others. In light of the findings of Asante and Collinge et al, there

should be drastic measures to safeguard the medical and surgical arena

from sporadic CJDs and all human TSEs. I only ponder how many sporadic

CJDs in the USA are type 2 PrPSc?


http://www.neurology.org/cgi/eletters/60/2/176#535

LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL


Volume 3, Number 8 01 August 2003


Newsdesk


Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America


Xavier Bosch

My name is Terry S Singeltary Sr, and I live in Bacliff, Texas. I lost

my mom to hvCJD (Heidenhain variant CJD) and have been searching for

answers ever since. What I have found is that we have not been told the

truth. CWD in deer and elk is a small portion of a much bigger problem.


49-year-old Singeltary is one of a number of people who have remained

largely unsatisfied after being told that a close relative died from a

rapidly progressive dementia compatible with spontaneous

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). So he decided to gather hundreds of

documents on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and

realised that if Britons could get variant CJD from bovine spongiform

encephalopathy (BSE), Americans might get a similar disorder from

chronic wasting disease (CWD)the relative of mad cow disease seen among

deer and elk in the USA. Although his feverish search did not lead him

to the smoking gun linking CWD to a similar disease in North American

people, it did uncover a largely disappointing situation.


Singeltary was greatly demoralised at the few attempts to monitor the

occurrence of CJD and CWD in the USA. Only a few states have made CJD

reportable. Human and animal TSEs should be reportable nationwide and

internationally, he complained in a letter to the Journal of the

American Medical Association (JAMA 2003; 285: 733). I hope that the CDC

does not continue to expect us to still believe that the 85% plus of all

CJD cases which are sporadic are all spontaneous, without route or source.


Until recently, CWD was thought to be confined to the wild in a small

region in Colorado. But since early 2002, it has been reported in other

areas, including Wisconsin, South Dakota, and the Canadian province of

Saskatchewan. Indeed, the occurrence of CWD in states that were not

endemic previously increased concern about a widespread outbreak and

possible transmission to people and cattle.


To date, experimental studies have proven that the CWD agent can be

transmitted to cattle by intracerebral inoculation and that it can cross

the mucous membranes of the digestive tract to initiate infection in

lymphoid tissue before invasion of the central nervous system. Yet the

plausibility of CWD spreading to people has remained elusive.


Part of the problem seems to stem from the US surveillance system. CJD

is only reported in those areas known to be endemic foci of CWD.

Moreover, US authorities have been criticised for not having performed

enough prionic tests in farm deer and elk.


Although in November last year the US Food and Drug Administration

issued a directive to state public-health and agriculture officials

prohibiting material from CWD-positive animals from being used as an

ingredient in feed for any animal species, epidemiological control and

research in the USA has been quite different from the situation in the

UK and Europe regarding BSE.


Getting data on TSEs in the USA from the government is like pulling

teeth, Singeltary argues. You get it when they want you to have it,

and only what they want you to have.


Norman Foster, director of the Cognitive Disorders Clinic at the

University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI, USA), says that current

surveillance of prion disease in people in the USA is inadequate to

detect whether CWD is occurring in human beings; adding that, the

cases that we know about are reassuring, because they do not suggest the

appearance of a new variant of CJD in the USA or atypical features in

patients that might be exposed to CWD. However, until we establish a

system that identifies and analyses a high proportion of suspected prion

disease cases we will not know for sure. The USA should develop a

system modelled on that established in the UK, he points out.

Ali Samii, a neurologist at Seattle VA Medical Center who recently

reported the cases of three hunterstwo of whom were friendswho died

from pathologically confirmed CJD, says that at present there are

insufficient data to claim transmission of CWD into humans; adding that

[only] by asking [the questions of venison consumption and deer/elk

hunting] in every case can we collect suspect cases and look into the

plausibility of transmission further. Samii argues that by making both

doctors and hunters more aware of the possibility of prions spreading

through eating venison, doctors treating hunters with dementia can

consider a possible prion disease, and doctors treating CJD patients

will know to ask whether they ate venison.


CDC spokesman Ermias Belay says that the CDC will not be investigating

the [Samii] cases because there is no evidence that the men ate

CWD-infected meat. He notes that although the likelihood of CWD

jumping the species barrier to infect humans cannot be ruled out 100%

and that [we] cannot be 100% sure that CWD does not exist in humans&

the data seeking evidence of CWD transmission to humans have been very

limited.


http://infection.thelancet.com/journal/journal.isa


he complained in a letter to the Journal of the American Medical

Association (JAMA 2003; 285: 733). I hope that the CDC does not

continue to expect us to still believe that the 85% plus of all CJD

cases which are sporadic are all spontaneous, without route or source.<<<

actually, that quote was from a more recent article in the Journal of

Neurology (see below), not the JAMA article...

Full Text

Diagnosis and Reporting of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Singeltary, Sr et al. JAMA.2001; 285: 733-734.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/285/6/733?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=
10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=dignosing+and+reporting+creutzfeldt+jakob+disease&
searchid=1048865596978_1528&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=0&journalcode=jama

BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL

SOMETHING TO CHEW ON

BMJ

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/319/7220/1312/b#EL2

BMJ

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/320/7226/8/b#EL1

THE PATHOLOGICAL PROTEIN

BY Philip Yam

Yam Philip Yam News Editor Scientific American www.sciam.com
http://www.thepathologicalprotein.com/

IN light of Asante/Collinge et al findings that BSE transmission to the
129-methionine genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is
indistinguishable from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

-------- Original Message -------- Subject: re-BSE prions propagate as

either variant CJD-like or sporadic CJD Date: Thu, 28 Nov 2002 10:23:43

-0000 From: "Asante, Emmanuel A" To:
"'flounder@wt.net'"

Dear Terry,

I have been asked by Professor Collinge to respond to your request. I am

a Senior Scientist in the MRC Prion Unit and the lead author on the

paper. I have attached a pdf copy of the paper for your attention. Thank

you for your interest in the paper.

In respect of your first question, the simple answer is, yes. As you

will find in the paper, we have managed to associate the alternate

phenotype to type 2 PrPSc, the commonest sporadic CJD.

It is too early to be able to claim any further sub-classification in

respect of Heidenhain variant CJD or Vicky Rimmer's version. It will

take further studies, which are on-going, to establish if there are

sub-types to our initial finding which we are now reporting. The main

point of the paper is that, as well as leading to the expected new

variant CJD phenotype, BSE transmission to the 129-methionine genotype

can lead to an alternate phenotype which is indistinguishable from type

2 PrPSc.

I hope reading the paper will enlighten you more on the subject. If I

can be of any further assistance please to not hesitate to ask. Best wishes.

Emmanuel Asante

<> ____________________________________

Dr. Emmanuel A Asante MRC Prion Unit & Neurogenetics Dept. Imperial

College School of Medicine (St. Mary's) Norfolk Place, LONDON W2 1PG

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 3794 Fax: +44 (0)20 7706 3272 email:

e.asante@ic.ac.uk (until 9/12/02)

New e-mail: e.asante@prion.ucl.ac.uk (active from now)

____________________________________

snip...

full text ;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm


AND the new findings of BASE in cattle in Italy of Identification of a
second bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy: Molecular
similarities with sporadic

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0305777101v1


Adaptation of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent to primates
and comparison with Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease: Implications for
human health

THE findings from Corinne Ida Lasmézas*, [dagger] , Jean-Guy Fournier*,
Virginie Nouvel*,

Hermann Boe*, Domíníque Marcé*, François Lamoury*, Nicolas Kopp [Dagger

] , Jean-Jacques Hauw§, James Ironside¶, Moira Bruce [||] , Dominique

Dormont*, and Jean-Philippe Deslys* et al, that The agent responsible
for French iatrogenic growth hormone-linked CJD taken as a control is
very different from vCJD but is similar to that found in one case of
sporadic CJD and one sheep scrapie isolate;

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/041490898v1

Characterization of two distinct prion strains
derived from bovine spongiform encephalopathy
transmissions to inbred mice

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/8/2471


ALL animals for human/animal consumption must be tested for TSE.

ALL human TSEs must be made reportable Nationally and Internationally, OF
ALL AGES...TSS


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jerry Feaser"
To: "DSF Subscriber"
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2005 11:02 AM
Subject: Pennsylvania Game Commission - State Wildlife Management Agency
eAlert: Newsroom


> Release #144-05
>
> HUNTERS CAN BEGIN TO APPLY FOR SECOND SPRING GOBBLER TAG
>
> Pennsylvania hunters interested in applying for a second spring gobbler
tag can begin doing so on Jan. 1, according to Game Commission Executive
Director Vern Ross. Applications are available on page 36 of the 2005-06
Pennsylvania Digest of Hunting and Trapping Regulations, which is provided
to each license buyer, or by going to the agency's website
(www.pgc.state.pa.us), and clicking on "Spring Turkey Tag App." in the
"Quick Clicks" box in the upper right hand corner of the homepage.
>
> Fees set by state law for the special license are $21 for residents and
$41 for nonresidents. Mailed applications for special wild turkey licenses
must be sent to: Pennsylvania Game Commission, Special Spring Gobbler
License, P.O. Box 61317, Harrisburg, PA 17106-1317.
>
> The applications period closes on April 1, and the spring gobbler season
is set for April 29-May 27. Hunters are allowed to submit only one
application for the special wild turkey license during a license year.
>
> Ross stressed that hunters are able to take one spring gobbler as part of
their general hunting privileges. However, the special license will afford
those hunters interested in this additional opportunity to take a second
spring gobbler.
>
> For more information, please visit the Pennsylvania Game Commission -
State Wildlife Management Agency website:
http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=11&Q=166953
>





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